CHAPTER 64INFECTIOUS AND CONTAGIOUS DISEASES[Appeared as Ch 1, 1973 IDR][Ch 16, IAC 7/1/75 renumbered as 11.3, 12.1 to 12.33, and 16.24 and 16.25 renumbered 16.6 and 16.7as per written instructions from Ag. Dept.10/11/77][Prior to 7/27/88, see Agriculture Department 30—Ch 16]21—64.1(163)  Reporting disease.  Whenever any person or persons who shall have knowledge of the existence of any infectious or contagious disease, such disease affecting the animals within the state or resulting in exposure thereto, which may prove detrimental to the health of the animals within the state, it shall be the duty of such person or persons to report the same in writing to the State Veterinarian, Bureau of Animal Industry, Wallace State Office Building, Des Moines, Iowa 50319, who shall then take such action as deemed necessary for the suppression and prevention of such disease. The diseases as classified by the Office International Des Epizooties are included. The following named diseases are infectious or contagious and the diagnosis or suspected diagnosis of any of these diseases in animals must be reported promptly to the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship by the veterinarian making the diagnosis or suspected diagnosis:  64.1(1)    Multiple species diseases.  
  • Anthrax
  • Aujeszky’s disease
  • Bluetongue
  • Brucellosis (Brucella abortus)
  • Brucellosis (Brucella melitensis)
  • Brucellosis (Brucella suis)
  • Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever
  • Echinococcosis/hydatidosis
  • Epizootic haemorrhagic disease
  • Equine encephalomyelitis (Eastern)
  • Foot and mouth disease
  • Heartwater
  • Japanese encephalitis
  • Johne’s disease
  • Leptospirosis
  • New world screwworm (Cochliomyia hominivorax)
  • Old world screwworm (Chrysomya bezziana)
  • Q fever
  • Rabies
  • Rift Valley fever
  • Rinderpest
  • Surra (Trypanosoma evansi)
  • Trichinellosis
  • Tularemia
  • Vesicular stomatitis
  • West Nile fever
  •   64.1(2)    Cattle diseases.  
  • Bovine anaplasmosis
  • Bovine babesiosis
  • Bovine genital campylobacteriosis
  • Bovine spongiform encephalopathy
  • Bovine tuberculosis
  • Bovine viral diarrhoea
  • Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia
  • Enzootic bovine leukosis
  • Haemorrhagic septicaemia
  • Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis
  • Lumpy skin disease
  • Theileriosis
  • Trichomonosis
  • Trypanosomosis (tsetse-transmitted)
  •   64.1(3)    Swine diseases.  
  • African swine fever
  • Classical swine fever
  • Nipah virus encephalitis
  • Porcine cysticercosis
  • Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome
  • Swine vesicular disease
  • Transmissible gastroenteritis
  •   64.1(4)    Sheep and goat diseases.  
  • Caprine arthritis/encephalitis
  • Contagious agalactia
  • Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia
  • Enzootic abortion of ewes (ovine chlamydiosis)
  • Maedi-visna
  • Nairobi sheep disease
  • Ovine epididymitis (Brucella ovis)
  • Peste des petits ruminants
  • Salmonellosis (S. abortusovis)
  • Scrapie
  • Sheep pox and goat pox
  •   64.1(5)    Equine diseases.  
  • African horse sickness
  • Contagious equine metritis
  • Dourine
  • Equine encephalomyelitis (Western)
  • Equine infectious anaemia
  • Equine influenza
  • Equine piroplasmosis
  • Equine rhinopneumonitis
  • Equine viral arteritis
  • Glanders
  • Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis
  •   64.1(6)    Avian diseases.  
  • Avian chlamydiosis
  • Avian infectious bronchitis
  • Avian infectious laryngotracheitis
  • Avian mycoplasmosis (M. gallisepticum)
  • Avian mycoplasmosis (M. synoviae)
  • Duck virus hepatitis
  • Fowl cholera
  • Fowl typhoid
  • Highly pathogenic avian influenza and low pathogenic avian influenza in poultry
  • Infectious bursal disease (Gumboro disease)
  • Marek’s disease
  • Newcastle disease
  • Pullorum disease
  • Turkey rhinotracheitis
  •   64.1(7)    Lagomorph diseases.  
  • Myxomatosis
  • Rabbit haemorrhagic disease
  •   64.1(8)    Fish diseases.  
  • Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis
  • Epizootic ulcerative syndrome
  • Gyrodactylosis (Gyrodactylus salaris)
  • Infectious haematopoietic necrosis
  • Infectious salmon anaemia
  • Koi herpesvirus disease
  • Red sea bream iridoviral disease
  • Spring viraemia of carp
  • Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia
  •   64.1(9)    Mollusc diseases.  
  • Infection with abalone herpes-like virus
  • Infection with Bonamia exitiosa
  • Infection with Bonamia ostreae
  • Infection with Marteilia refringens
  • Infection with Perkinsus marinus
  • Infection with Perkinsus olseni
  • Infection with Xenohaliotis californiensis
  •   64.1(10)    Crustacean diseases.  
  • Crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci)
  • Infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis
  • Infectious myonecrosis
  • Taura syndrome
  • White spot disease
  • White tail disease
  • Yellowhead disease
  •   64.1(11)    Amphibian diseases.  
  • Infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
  • Infection with ranavirus
  •   64.1(12)    Other diseases.  
  • Camel pox
  • Chronic wasting disease
  • Leishmaniosis
  • Reporting is required for any case or suspicious case of an animal having any disease that may be caused by bioterrorism, epidemic or pandemic disease, or novel or highly fatal infectious agents or biological toxins and that might pose a substantial risk of a significant number of animal fatalities, incidents of acute short-term illness in animals, or incidents of permanent or long-term disability in animals.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1, 163.2, 189A.12, 189A.13 and 197.5.
    Related ARC(s): 9102B, 0230C21—64.2(163)  Disease prevention and suppression.  Whenever the chief of division of animal industry shall have knowledge of an outbreak of any contagious, infectious or communicable disease among domestic animals in the state, the chief of the division of animal industry shall take such action as necessary for the prevention and suppression of such disease, including establishment, enforcement and maintenance of quarantines. The chief of the division of animal industry is authorized and empowered to obtain assistance of any peace officer.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1 and 163.10.21—64.3(163)  Duties of township trustees and health board.  Whenever notice is given to the trustees of a township or to a local board of health that animals are suspected of being affected with or having been exposed to any contagious, infectious or communicable disease, they may impose such restrictions as deemed necessary to prevent the spread of the disease. It shall be the duty of such township trustees or local boards to immediately notify the chief of division of animal industry.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.17.21—64.4(163)  “Exposed” defined.  An animal must be considered as “exposed” when it has stood in a stable with, or been in contact with, any animal known to be affected with a contagious, infectious or transmissible disease; or if placed in a stable, yard or other enclosure where such diseased animal or animals have been kept unless such stable, yard or other enclosure has been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected after containing animals so affected.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.5(163)  Sale of vaccine.  No attenuated or live culture vaccine or virus shall be sold or offered for sale at retail except to a licensed veterinarian of this state, nor shall it be administered to any livestock or poultry except by a licensed veterinarian of the state of Iowa. This does not apply to the sale of and administration of virulent classical swine fever virus when sold to and administered by valid permit holders for its use on hogs owned by themselves on their own premises.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.6(163)  “Quarantine” defined.  The term “quarantine” shall be construed to mean the perfect isolation of all diseased or suspected animals from contact with other animals as well as the exclusion of other animals from yards, stables, enclosures or grounds where suspected or diseased animals are or have been kept.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.7(163)  Chiefs of Iowa and U.S. animal industries to cooperate.  The department of agriculture and land stewardship hereby authorizes and directs the chief of division of animal industry to cooperate with the bureau of animal industry, United States Department of Agriculture, in all regulations for the prevention, control and eradication of contagious and infectious diseases among domestic animals in the state of Iowa.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.8(163)  Animal blood sample collection.  Any animal slaughtered in Iowa is subject to having blood samples taken in order to determine whether the animal is infected with an infectious or contagious disease. Upon written notification from the department or from the United States Department of Agriculture, the management of a slaughter facility shall provide for or permit the collection of blood samples for testing from any animal confined at or being slaughtered at such a facility.If the department or the United States Department of Agriculture chooses to place government employees or private contractors in the facility for the purpose of collecting the blood samples, neither the facility nor the management of the facility shall charge a fee for providing such access. In addition, the slaughter facility shall provide blood collectors access to facilities routinely available to plant employees such as rest rooms, lockers, break rooms, lunchrooms, and storage facilities to facilitate blood collection in the same manner and on the same terms as the facility provides access to the facility to meat inspectors employed by the department or the Food Safety Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture.21—64.9    Reserved.GLANDERS AND FARCY CONTROL21—64.10(163)  Preventing spread of glanders.  No person owning or having the care or custody of any animal affected with glanders or farcy, or which there is a reason to believe is affected with said disease, shall lead, drive or permit such animal to go on or over any public grounds, unenclosed lands, street, road, public highway, lane or alley; or permit such animal to drink at any public watering trough, pail or spring, or keep such diseased animal in any enclosure in or from which such diseased animal may come in contact with, or in proximity to, any animal not affected with such disease.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.20.21—64.11(163)  Disposal of diseased animal.  Whenever any animal affected with glanders dies or is destroyed the carcass of such animal shall be disposed of as determined by the department.As glanders is transmissible to human beings great care must be exercised in handling diseased animals or carcasses.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.Related ARC(s): 2591C21—64.12(163)  Glanders quarantine.  It shall be the duty of the chief of division of animal industry to maintain quarantine on all animals affected with glanders until such animals have been destroyed by consent of the owner or otherwise, and carcasses disposed of in accordance with 21—64.11(163) and the premises where the same have been kept thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.2.21—64.13(163)  Tests for glanders and farcy.  In suspected cases of glanders and farcy the most efficient field test is the intrapalpebral mallein test, and as valuable aids to diagnosis the mallein Strass’ agglutination and precipitation tests shall be recognized.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.14    Reserved.BLACKLEG CONTROL21—64.15(163)  Blackleg.  Upon the appearance of an outbreak of blackleg on any premises all calves and yearlings on the premises should be promptly immunized. All carcasses of animals dead of blackleg must be burned intact without removal of the hide. Such carcasses may be disposed of by removal within 24 hours by the operator of a regularly licensed rendering plant. In the event that the owner of any animal dead from blackleg neglects or refuses to make such disposition of the carcass or carcasses as indicated above, then in such cases the disposal shall be handled in accordance with 21—61.33(163).This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 167.18 and 163.2.21—64.16    Reserved.DEPARTMENT NOTIFICATION OF DISEASES21—64.17(163)  Notification of chief of animal industry.  It shall be the duty of any city or local board of health or township trustees, whenever notice is given of animals being affected with rabies, glanders, scabies, classical swine fever or any contagious or infectious disease or having been exposed to the same, to promptly notify the state veterinarian.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.17.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.18    Reserved.21—64.19    Reserved.21—64.20    Reserved.21—64.21    Reserved.21—64.22    Reserved.RABIES CONTROL21—64.23(163)  Rabies—exposed animals.  Whenever rabies is known to exist in any community it shall be the duty of all owners of dogs or other exposed animals to immediately confine such dogs or animals securely to prevent them from spreading the infection should they develop the disease.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 351.39.21—64.24(163)  Rabies quarantine.  When quarantine is established in any community on account of the existence of rabies all dogs not confined or muzzled shall be promptly destroyed.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 351.40.21—64.25(351)  Control and prevention of rabies.    64.25(1)    Antirabies vaccine.    a.  Vaccines and immunization procedures recommended in the Compendium of Animal Rabies Vaccines prepared by the National Association of Public Health Veterinarians, Inc.are approved by the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship.  b.  Reserved.  64.25(2)    Tag and certificate.    a.  The veterinarian shall issue a tag with the numerical number thereon and the certificate of vaccination shall designate the tag number.  b.  Each rabies vaccination certificate issued by the veterinarian must be an Official Rabies Vaccination Certificate approved by the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 351.35.21—64.26    Reserved.21—64.27    Reserved.21—64.28    Reserved.21—64.29    Reserved.SCABIES OR MANGE CONTROL21—64.30(163)  Scabies or mange quarantine.  Whenever the state veterinarian shall have knowledge of any horses, cattle, sheep or swine affected with scabies or mange, owners of any horses, cattle, sheep or swine affected shall medicate the animals at intervals the state veterinarian deems necessary with a method approved by the state veterinarian.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 166A.8.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.31    Reserved.DISEASE CONTROL AT FAIRS AND EXHIBITS21—64.32(163)  State fairgrounds—disinfection of livestock quarters.  It shall be the duty of the chief of division of animal industry to supervise the disinfection of all buildings, stalls and pens at the state fairgrounds just prior to the opening of such fair and to supervise the disinfecting daily of hog pens and such other enclosures.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.33(163)  County fairs—disinfection of livestock quarters.  It shall be the duty of all secretaries of all county fairs or exhibitions of livestock in the state of Iowa, excepting the Iowa state fair, to supervise the disinfecting of all buildings, stalls and pens prior to the opening of such county fair or exhibition of livestock and to disinfect hog pens and all such enclosures daily during such fairs and exhibitions.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.34(163)  Health requirements for exhibition of livestock, poultry and birds at the state fair, district shows and exhibitions.    64.34(1)    General requirements.  All animals, poultry and birds intended for any exhibition will be considered under quarantine and not eligible for showing until the owner or agent presents an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The certificate must be issued by an accredited veterinarian within 30 days (14 days for sheep) prior to the date of entry; and must indicate that the veterinarian has inspected the animals, poultry or birds and any nurse stock that accompany them, and that they are apparently free from symptoms of any infectious disease (including warts, ringworm, footrot, draining abscesses and pinkeye) or any communicable disease. Individual Certificates of Veterinary Inspection will not be required in certain classes, if the division superintendent for the exhibition has made prior arrangements with the official fair veterinarian to have all animals and birds inspected on arrival.  64.34(2)    Breeding cattle.    a.    Tuberculosis.  Cattle originating from a USDA accredited-free state or zone may be exhibited without other testing requirements when accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification. Cattle from a herd or area under quarantine for tuberculosis may not be exhibited. Cattle from a state or zone which is not a USDA accredited-free state or zone must meet the following requirements:  (1)  Have had an individual animal test conducted within 60 days of the exhibition; or  (2)  Originate from a tuberculosis accredited-free herd, with the accredited herd number and date of last test listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; and  (3)  Have been issued a preentry permit from the state veterinarian’s office.  b.    Brucellosis.    (1)  Native Iowa cattle originating from a herd not under quarantine may be exhibited when accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification.  (2)  Cattle originating outside the state must meet one of the following requirements:
    1. Originate from brucellosis class “free” states, accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification; or
    2. Be beef heifers under 24 months of age and dairy heifers under 20 months of age which are official brucellosis vaccinates, accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists the official calfhood vaccination tattoo and individual official identification; or
    3. Be animals of any age that originate from a herd not under quarantine, accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists a report of a negative brucellosis test conducted within 30 days prior to opening date of exhibition and individual official identification; or
    4. Originate from a certified brucellosis-free herd, accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification, herd number, and date of last test; or
    5. Be calves under six months of age, accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification.
      (3)  All brucellosis tests must have been confirmed by a state-federal laboratory. All nurse cows which accompany calves to be exhibited must meet the health requirements set forth in 64.34(2)“b.”  (4)  All cattle originating from states not classified as “free” for brucellosis must have been issued a preentry permit from the state veterinarian’s office.
      64.34(3)    Market beef cattle.  Steers and beef-type heifers exhibited in market classes must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, showing individual official identification for each animal, and must originate from a herd not under quarantine.  64.34(4)    Swine.  All swine must originate from a herd or area not under quarantine and must be individually identified on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Plastic tags issued by 4-H officials may be substituted for an official metal test tag, when an additional identification (ear notch) is also recorded on the test chart and Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. All identification is to be recorded on the pseudorabies test chart and the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.  a.    Brucellosis.  All breeding swine six months of age and older must:  (1)  Originate from a brucellosis class “free” state; or  (2)  Originate from a brucellosis validated herd with herd certification number and date of last test listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; or  (3)  Have a negative brucellosis test conducted within 60 days prior to show and confirmed by a state-federal laboratory.  b.    Aujeszky’s Disease (pseudorabies)—all swine.    (1)  Native Iowa swine. Exhibitors of native Iowa swine that originate from a Stage IV or lower-status county must present a test record and Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that indicate that each swine has had a negative test for pseudorabies within 30 days prior to the show (individual show regulations may have more restrictive time restrictions), regardless of the status of the herd, and that show individual official identification. Exhibitors of native Iowa swine that originate from a Stage V county must present a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification. No pseudorabies testing requirements will be necessary for native Iowa swine that originate from Stage V counties. Electronic identification will not be considered official identification for exhibition purposes.  (2)  Swine originating outside Iowa. All exhibitors must present a test record and Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that indicate that each swine has had a negative test for pseudorabies within 30 days prior to the show (individual show regulations may have more restrictive time restrictions), regardless of the status of the herd, and that show individual official identification. Electronic identification will not be considered official identification for exhibition purposes.  64.34(5)    Sheep and goats.  All sheep and goats must be individually identified and a record of the identification noted on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection and must originate from a herd or flock not under quarantine. Any evidence of club lamb fungus, draining abscesses, ringworm, footrot, sore mouth or any other contagious disease shall eliminate the animal from the show. The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection for sheep shall require clinical inspection by an accredited veterinarian within 14 days (30 days for goats) prior to date of entry to exhibition grounds.  a.    Sheep and goats—scrapie.  All sexually intact sheep must be identified with an individual scrapie flock of origin identification tag, and this number must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.All sexually intact goats must be identified with an individual scrapie flock of origin identification tag or by an official registered tattoo, and one of these numbers must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection must also include a statement certifying the herd’s participation in the scrapie program.  b.    Goats—brucellosis and tuberculosis.  Goats must be from a state certified brucellosis-free herd or have a record of a negative brucellosis test performed within 90 days of the exhibition. In addition, they must originate from a herd having a negative tuberculosis test within the last 12 months or have a record of a negative tuberculosis test performed within 90 days of exhibition.  64.34(6)    Horses and mules.  Native Iowa horses and mules can be exhibited when accompanied by an individual Certificate of Veterinary Inspection listing individual identification or a description of the individual animals.All equine, six months of age or older, originating from outside the state shall be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection listing individual identification or a description of the individual animals; and indicating that each animal in the shipment has had a negative official equine infectious anemia test within 12 months of importation. The testing laboratory, laboratory accession number and date of test must appear on the certificate.  64.34(7)    Poultry and birds.  All poultry exhibited must come from U.S. pullorum-typhoid clean or equivalent flocks; or have had a negative pullorum-typhoid test performed within 90 days of the exhibition by an authorized tester. An approved certificate verifying this status shall accompany the exhibit.  64.34(8)    Dogs and cats.  Dogs and cats exhibited must have current, official rabies vaccination certificates.  64.34(9)    Removal from fair or exhibition.  The veterinary inspector in charge shall order that any livestock, poultry or birds found to be infected with any contagious or infectious disease be removed from the fair or exhibition.  64.34(10)    Cervidae.  For the purposes of this subrule, “Cervidae” means all animals belonging to the Cervidae family, and “CWD susceptible Cervidae” means whitetail deer, blacktail deer, mule deer, red deer, and elk.  a.    Native Iowa Cervidae.  Native Iowa Cervidae from a herd not under quarantine may be exhibited without additional testing for brucellosis or tuberculosis. CWD susceptible Cervidae intended for exhibition must originate from a herd that has completed at least one year in the CWD monitoring program. Native Iowa Cervidae may be exhibited without other testing requirements when the Cervidae are accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification and the monitored CWD cervid herd number or certified CWD herd number for CWD susceptible Cervidae, including the status level and anniversary date, and contains the following statement:“All Cervidae listed on this certificate have been part of the herd of origin for at least one year or were natural additions to the herd. There has been no diagnosis, sign, or epidemiological evidence of chronic wasting disease in this herd for the past year.”  b.    Cervidae originating outside Iowa.  Cervidae that originate outside Iowa must obtain an entry permit from the state veterinarian’s office prior to import into Iowa. Cervidae that originate outside Iowa which are six months of age or older must originate from a herd not under quarantine and have been tested negative for Tuberculosis (TB) by the Single Cervical Tuberculin (SCT) test (Cervidae) or by the Cervid TB Stat-Pak test within 90 days of exhibition, or originate from an Accredited Herd (Cervidae), or originate from a Qualified Herd (Cervidae), with test dates shown on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Herd status and SCT test are according to USDA Tuberculosis Eradication in Cervidae Uniform Methods and Rules, effective January 22, 1999.Cervidae that originate outside Iowa which are six months of age or older must also have been tested negative for brucellosis within 90 days of exhibition, or originate from a certified brucellosis-free cervid herd, or a cervid class-free status state (brucellosis). This negative test result must be determined by brucellosis tests approved for cattle and bison, and the test must have been conducted in a cooperative state-federal laboratory.  (1)  All CWD susceptible Cervidae must have originated from a monitored or certified CWD cervid herd in which the animals have been kept for at least one year or to which the animals were natural additions. The originating herd must have achieved a CWD status equal to completion of three years in an approved CWD monitoring program, and the CWD herd number and enrollment date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Cervidae originating from a herd with a diagnosis, sign, or epidemiological evidence of CWD or from an area under quarantine for chronic wasting disease shall not be exhibited. The following statement must appear on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection:“All Cervidae listed on this certificate originate from a chronic wasting disease monitored or certified herd in which these animals have been kept for at least one year or to which the animals were natural additions. There has been no diagnosis, sign, or epidemiological evidence of chronic wasting disease in this herd for the past year.”  (2)  Other Cervidae. For all other Cervidae, the following statement must appear on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection:“All Cervidae listed on this certificate have been part of the herd of origin for at least one year or were natural additions to this herd. There has been no diagnosis, sign, or epidemiological evidence of chronic wasting disease in this herd for the past year.”This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1 and 163.14.
    Related ARC(s): 9942B, 0656C21—64.35(163)  Health requirements for exhibition of livestock, poultry and birds at exhibitions.  Each county fair shall have an official veterinarian who will inspect all livestock, poultry and birds when they are unloaded or shortly thereafter. No Certificate of Veterinary Inspection will be required on livestock, poultry and birds exhibited at a county 4-H or FFA show. Quarantined animals or animals from quarantined herds cannot be exhibited. Evidence of warts, ringworm, footrot, pinkeye, draining abscesses or any other contagious or infectious condition will eliminate the animal from the show.  64.35(1)    Swine exhibition requirements.  “Swine exhibition” means an exhibit, demonstration, show, or competition involving an event on the state fairgrounds, a county fair, or other exhibition event. The sponsor of the exhibition must retain an Iowa licensed veterinarian to supervise the health of the swine at the exhibition location. The sponsor must electronically file the approved registration form and obtain approval from the state veterinarian at least 30 days before the event. The registration form includes the name of the exhibition and the address and telephone number of its location; the name, address and telephone number of the veterinarian; and the date of the planned exhibition. Sales of swine will not be allowed unless the event has been registered and received approval from the state veterinarian 30 days prior to the event.  64.35(2)    Swine exhibition report required.  The sponsor of the swine exhibition shall electronically submit to the department the approved report form within five business days after the conclusion of the exhibition. The form includes the name of the exhibition and the address and telephone number of its location; the name, address and telephone number of the veterinarian; the date that the exhibition occurred; the name, address and telephone number of the owner of the swine; and the address and telephone number of the premises from which the swine was moved after the exhibition if such premises is a different premises.  64.35(3)    Dogs and cats.  All dogs and cats exhibited in county exhibitions must have a current, official rabies certification.  64.35(4)    Poultry and birds.  Except as provided in this subrule, all poultry exhibited must come from U.S. pullorum-typhoid clean or equivalent flocks; or have had a negative pullorum-typhoid test performed within 90 days of exhibition by an authorized tester. An approved certificate verifying this status shall accompany the exhibit.However, no testing for salmonella pullorum-typhoid shall be required for “market classes” of poultry, if the poultry are consigned to a slaughter establishment directly from the exhibition. Poultry exhibited in these “market classes” shall be maintained separate and apart from poultry not exempted from the testing requirements. Separate and apart shall include both of the following: holding poultry so that neither poultry nor organic material originating from the poultry has physical contact with other poultry; and poultry exhibited in “market classes” shall be maintained in enclosures at least ten feet apart or separated by an eight-foot high solid partition from all other poultry. Poultry exhibited in “market classes” shall be so declared at the time of entry into this exhibition or before.All enclosures maintaining poultry shall be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.  64.35(5)    Sheep and goats.  All sexually intact sheep must have an individual scrapie flock of origin identification tag. All sexually intact goats must have an individual scrapie flock of origin identification tag or an official registered tattoo.  64.35(6)    Cervidae.  Native Iowa Cervidae from a herd not under quarantine may be exhibited without additional testing for brucellosis or tuberculosis. CWD susceptible Cervidae intended for exhibition must originate from a herd that has completed at least one year in the CWD monitoring program. Native Iowa Cervidae may be exhibited without other testing requirements when the Cervidae are accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that lists individual official identification and the monitored CWD cervid herd number or certified CWD herd number for CWD susceptible Cervidae, including the status level and anniversary date, and contains the following statement:“All Cervidae listed on this certificate have been part of the herd of origin for at least one year or were natural additions to the herd. There has been no diagnosis, sign, or epidemiological evidence of chronic wasting disease in this herd for the past year.”  64.35(7)    Show veterinarian.  The decision of the show veterinarian shall be final.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1 and 163.14.Related ARC(s): 9942B21—64.36    Reserved.21—64.37    Reserved.DISEASE CONTROL BY CONVEYANCES21—64.38(163)  Transportation companies—disinfecting livestock quarters.  All railroad and transportation companies are hereby required to provide for proper drainage of all stockyards, pens, alleyways and chutes, and to clean and disinfect the same between April 15 and May 15 of each year and at such other times as may be deemed necessary. All expense incurred for the disinfecting and supervision of same must be paid by the railroad company. The chief of the division of animal industry shall enforce this rule.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.39(163)  Livestock vehicles—disinfection.  It is hereby ordered by the state of Iowa, secretary of agriculture, that all cars or vehicles that have been used for conveying any animal or animals that have been found to have suffered or are suffering from any contagious or infectious diseases must be cleaned and disinfected thoroughly before leaving the yards where such animal or animals have been unloaded within the state of Iowa.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.40    Reserved.INTRASTATE MOVEMENT OF LIVESTOCK21—64.41(163)  General.  All places where livestock is assembled, either bought or sold for purposes other than immediate slaughter, whether by private sale or public auction, when not under federal supervision must be under state supervision.  64.41(1)  The management of all livestock auction markets shall make application for, and obtain a permit from the department to conduct such sales.  64.41(2)  Before movement, the livestock shall comply with requirements as set forth below.  64.41(3)  Livestock imported for resale shall meet all health requirements governing their admission into the state as set forth in 21—Chapter 65.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1, 163.11, and 163.14.21—64.42(163)  Veterinary inspection.    64.42(1)  All livestock markets shall be under the general supervision of the Chief, Bureau of Animal Industry, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Des Moines, Iowa 50319, and the direct supervision of the approved veterinary inspector. Markets shall pay inspection fees directly to the veterinary inspector.  64.42(2)  The veterinary inspector shall:  a.  Examine all livestock moving through the market.  b.  Prohibit the sale of any animal deemed to be diseased.  c.  Issue quarantines when required, and  d.  Supervise the cleaning and disinfection of yards following sales.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.43(163)  Swine.    64.43(1)    Brucellosis.  All breeding swine four months of age or over moving through a livestock market or offered for sale or sold by the owner by private treaty must:  a.  Originate from a validated herd, or from a validated brucellosis-free state according to Title 9 CFR as amended effective May 23, 1994, and published in the Federal Register, Vol. 59, No.77, April 21, 1994, or  b.  Be proved negative to a brucellosis test conducted within 60 days prior to sale or service and originate from a herd not under quarantine.All breeding swine showing a positive reaction to a brucellosis test conducted at a livestock market shall be tagged in the left ear with a reactor tag and moved direct to slaughter on permit. The herd of origin shall be placed under quarantine for immediate test. Such quarantine to remain in effect until a complete negative herd test is conducted.The negative animals from a reactor group disclosed at an auction market can return to the farm of origin under strict quarantine to be tested no sooner than 30 days nor later than 60 days from the date of test.  64.43(2)  Reserved.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163A.1 and 163A.3.21—64.44(163)  Farm deer.  Rescinded IAB 11/26/03, effective 12/31/03.21—64.45    Reserved.21—64.46    Reserved.BRUCELLOSIS21—64.47(163)  Definitions as used in these rules.    64.47(1)    “Department”  means the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Wallace State Office Building, Des Moines, Iowa.  64.47(2)    “Federal Office”  means the Animal, Plant and Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Federal Building, Des Moines, Iowa 50309.  64.47(3)    “Brucellosis”  means the disease of brucellosis in animals.  64.47(4)    “Brucellosis test”  means the blood serum test for brucellosis, applied in accordance with a technique approved by the department.  64.47(5)    “B.R.T.”  means a brucellosis ring test as applied to milk and cream, and used as a presumptive test for locating possible brucellosis infected herds according to a technique approved by the department.  64.47(6)    “Brucellosis test classification”  means the designation of animals tested by the methods of card test or rivanol or any other method approved jointly by the state and federal departments of agriculture.  64.47(7)    “Veterinarian”  means a graduate of an approved veterinary school who is licensed and registered to practice veterinary medicine in this state.  64.47(8)    “Designated animals”  means only the following named bovine animals: beef cattle, dairy cattle, American bison or “buffalo,” and their hybrids.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163A.9.21—64.48    Reserved.21—64.49(163)  Certified brucellosis-free herd.  In order to qualify a herd of cattle as brucellosis-free and receive a certificate evidencing same, the owner thereof shall comply with the following requirements:  64.49(1)    Certified brucellosis-free herd.  A herd may qualify for initial certification by a minimum of three consecutive negative milk ring tests (B.R.T.) conducted at not less than 90-day intervals, followed by a negative herd blood test conducted within 90 days after the last negative milk ring test; or at least two consecutive negative blood tests not less than 10 months nor more than 14 months apart. A herd may qualify for recertification by a negative blood test within 60 days of each anniversary date, and the certification period being 12 months. If recertification is not conducted within 60 days following the anniversary date, then certification requirements are the same for initial certification.  64.49(2)    Additions to certified herds.    a.  To certified herds:  (1)  From herds with equal status.  (2)  From once-tested clean herds. Calf vaccinated animals up to 30 months of age on certificate of vaccination—over 30 months if negative; or nonvaccinated animals on evidence of negative retest not less than 60 days from date of negative herd test.  b.  To once-tested clean herds:  (1)  From herds with equal or superior status.  (2)  From other herds, calfhood vaccinated animals up to 30 months of age on certificate of vaccination; over 30 months, if negative; nonvaccinated animals if tested negative, then segregated and retested negative in not less than 60 days.  64.49(3)  The owner or veterinarian shall make a request to the chief, division of animal industry for certification or recertification, for a brucellosis-free herd when the required tests are completed.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.50(163)  Restraining animals.  To facilitate the vaccination, taking of blood sample or identifying animals as reactors, it shall be the duty of the owner to confine the animals in a suitable enclosure and to restrain the individual animal in a manner sufficient to permit the veterinarian to perform any of the services required under laws and rules of Iowa.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.51(163)  Quarantines.    64.51(1)  Bovine animals classified as reactors shall be quarantined on the premises and not permitted to mingle with other cattle until disposed of for slaughter under a permit issued by the department or its authorized agent.  64.51(2)  All bovine animals comprising a herd operating under control Plan A shall be quarantined when one of its members has been classified as a reactor, such quarantine to remain in effect until two consecutive negative brucellosis tests, 30 to 60 days apart, have been made. No animals of such a herd may be moved or sold except to slaughter under permit issued by the department or its authorized agent except that the department in hardship cases may permit the movement of such animals other than to slaughter with quarantines remaining in effect at the new location, together with any new animals with which they may commingle.  64.51(3)  Owners of animals tested for brucellosis shall hold the entire herd on the premises until the results of the test are determined.  64.51(4)  Notice of quarantine shall be delivered in writing by the department or its authorized agent to the owner or caretaker of all cattle quarantined. A report of such quarantine shall also be filed with the department as prescribed.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 164.15 and 164.19.21—64.52(163)  Identification of bovine animals.    64.52(1)    Identification tag.  Every veterinarian, in conjunction with the testing of any bovine animal for brucellosis or the vaccination of any such animal, shall insert an identification tag of the type approved by the department in the right ear of each animal which is not so identified; provided that in the case of an animal registered with a purebred association, the registry or tattoo number assigned to the animal by such association may be used for identification in lieu of an identification tag.  64.52(2)    Official vaccinates.  An animal vaccinated with RB-51 brucella abortus vaccine must have an official identification tag in the right ear or an individual animal registration tattoo. Additionally, the animal must be tattooed in the right ear with the U.S. Registered Shield and the letter “V,” which shall be preceded by a letter “R” and followed by a number corresponding to the last digit of the year in which the animal was vaccinated.  64.52(3)    Reactor identification.  Bovine-reactor cattle eight months of age or over shall be permanently branded with a hot iron on the tailhead over the fourth to the seventh coccygeal vertebrae with the letter “B” not less than two inches nor more than three inches high and shall also be tagged in the left ear with a reactor identification tag approved by the department within 15 days of the date on which they were disclosed as reactors. This subrule shall not apply to official calfhood vaccination as defined in Iowa Code section 164.1. Such vaccinates need not be branded if they react to the brucellosis test until 30 months of age.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 164.11 and 164.12.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.53(163)  Cleaning and disinfection.  After any disclosure of reactors to the brucellosis test and following their disposal for slaughter, the owner of such cattle shall be required to clean and disinfect all barns and premises in which said cattle have been held. Such cleaning and disinfection shall be done in accordance with instructions and with a disinfectant approved by the department.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.54(163)  Disposal of reactors.    64.54(1)  Reactor cattle disclosed in herds operating under Plan A shall be tagged and branded within 15 days of the date the blood samples were taken. In accordance with Iowa law, an additional 30 days will be allowed for slaughter.  64.54(2)  All reactors shall be disposed of for slaughter only in plants operating under federal meat inspection or slaughtering establishment approved by the department and must be accompanied by a shipping permit ADE 1-27 issued by an accredited veterinarian.  64.54(3)  No cattle shall be disposed of through public sales or sales barns.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.17.21—64.55(163)  Brucellosis tests and reports.    64.55(1)  All brucellosis tests conducted at state-federal expense must be performed at a state-federal laboratory as determined by the department.  64.55(2)  The department shall approve a veterinarian as eligible to conduct brucellosis tests upon successful completion of a course of training and instruction provided by the department. The department shall specify the standards for maintaining such approval.  64.55(3)  All brucellosis tests conducted by a veterinarian must be reported to the department, on forms prescribed, within seven days following completion of such tests. A copy of such tests shall also be given to the herd owner by the veterinarian.  64.55(4)  Reports of vaccination shall be rendered by the veterinarian within 30 days in compliance with the regulation. It is from the information on these reports that the owner of the cattle will receive recognition as being under official supervision.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.10.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.56(163)  Suspect animals designated as reactors.    64.56(1)  A nonvaccinated animal classified as a suspect on the brucellosis test may be reclassified as a reactor by the veterinarian obtaining the blood sample provided that such an animal is known to have aborted and is from a herd containing reactors.  64.56(2)  Animals so designated in 64.38(1) and 64.38(2) will be eligible for indemnity in accordance with the laws and rules governing same.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.57(163)  Indemnity not allowed.    64.57(1)  No indemnity shall be paid unless the test was previously authorized by proper state or federal authority.  64.57(2)  No indemnity may be paid on an animal which was vaccinated when it was more than eight months of age.  64.57(3)  Rescinded.  64.57(4)  No indemnity may be paid as a result of a test of an official vaccinate less than 30 months of age.  64.57(5)  No indemnity may be paid upon reactors unless they are tagged, branded and slaughtered according to the state and federal regulations.  64.57(6)  No indemnity may be paid upon cattle entering the state of Iowa which have not met the requirements for entry as breeding or dairy cattle.  64.57(7)  No indemnity can be paid on reactors owned by the state or county.  64.57(8)  No indemnity may be paid on unregistered reactor bulls, steers or spayed heifers.  64.57(9)  No indemnity will be paid for brucellosis reactors when known reactors have been held on the premises for more than 30 days from the date on which they were tagged and branded.  64.57(10)  No indemnity will be paid when infected premises have not been cleaned and disinfected to the satisfaction of the department in such a manner as to prevent the further spread of the disease.  64.57(11)  No indemnity will be paid if the claimant has failed to comply with any of the requirements of these rules.  64.57(12)  No indemnity will be paid on brucellosis reactors disclosed in a herd unless a state-federal cooperative agreement has been signed by the owner prior to conducting the brucellosis test.  64.57(13)  No indemnity will be allowed unless all animals comprising the herd, both beef and dairy type, have been subjected to a brucellosis test conducted at the state-federal laboratory.  64.57(14)  No indemnity will be paid on any reactors unless they are slaughtered in a plant operating under federal meat inspection and accompanied by a shipping permit ADE 1-27 issued by an accredited veterinarian.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.15.21—64.58(163)  Area testing.    64.58(1)  Counties shall be tested in the order that valid petitions are received unless the department shall decide that it is not expedient to make tests in that order.  64.58(2)  All provisions of the rules as promulgated under authority of Iowa Code section 164.2 are also in effect for counties designated as under area testing.  64.58(3)  An area may be declared modified certified brucellosis-free by the application of two milk tests not less than six months apart, together with a blood test of all milk reacting herds and such other herds as are not included in the milk test. The number of reactors (exclusive of officially calf vaccinated animals under 30 months of age) must not exceed 1 percent of the cattle and the herd infection must not exceed 5 percent. Infected herds shall be quarantined until they have passed at least two consecutive blood tests not less than 60 days apart.  64.58(4)  If testing as outlined in 64.58(3) above reveals an animal infection rate of more than 1 percent, but not over 2 percent and a retest of the infected herds applied within 120 days discloses not more than 1 percent animal infection in not over 5 percent of the herds, the area may then be certified.  64.58(5)  If the test of an area as outlined under 64.58(3) results in more than 2 percent reactors, or if a retest of infected herds as under 64.58(3) does not qualify the area for certification, it shall be necessary to make a complete area retest.  64.58(6)  Recertification. Areas may be recertified with the application of semiannual milk tests, follow-up blood tests of milk reacting herds and blood tests at three-year intervals on 20 percent of all herds not included in the milk test, if the incidence of infection does not exceed 1 percent of the cattle and 5 percent of the herds under test.  64.58(7)  If testing as outlined under 64.58(6) reveals an animal infection rate of more than 1 percent, but not over 2 percent and a retest of the infected herds applied within 120 days discloses not more than 1 percent animal infection in not over 5 percent of the herds, the area may then be certified.  64.58(8)  Any area not qualifying for recertification under the provisions of 64.58(7) shall be required to reestablish its certified status through testing procedures as outlined under 64.58(3).  64.58(9)  The report of suspicious ring test of any herd shall be cause for a brucellosis test to be made.  64.58(10)  The report of negative ring test will exempt a herd from brucellosis test unless such herd is due a test because of previous infection.  64.58(11)  Milk producing herds missed on more than one regularly scheduled ring test will be required to have a brucellosis test made.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1, 164.2, 164.4, and 165.2.21—64.59    Reserved.21—64.60    Reserved.21—64.61    Reserved.21—64.62    Reserved.BOVINE BRUCELLOSIS21—64.63(164)  Back tagging in bovine brucellosis control.    64.63(1)  All bovine animals two years of age and older received for sale or shipment to a slaughtering establishment shall be identified with a back tag issued by the department. The back tag will be affixed to the animal as directed by the department.  64.63(2)  It shall be the duty of every livestock trucker, when delivering to an out-of-state market, and every livestock dealer, livestock market operator, stockyards operator and slaughtering establishment to identify all such bovine animals not bearing a back tag at the time of receiving possession or control of such animals. A livestock trucker may be exempted from this requirement if the animals are identified as to the farm of origin when delivered to a livestock market, stockyards or slaughtering establishment agreeing to accept responsibility for back tag identification.  64.63(3)  Every person required to identify animals under this rule shall file reports of such identification on forms prescribed by the department. Each such report will cover all animals identified during the preceding week.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.30.21—64.64(164)  Fee schedule.    64.64(1)    Bleeding.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and five dollars per head for all cattle bled.  64.64(2)    Tagging and branding reactors.  Fifteen dollars for the first reactor and five dollars for each additional reactor.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.6.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.65(163)  Definitions.    64.65(1)    Bleeding.  Bleeding shall mean the taking of a blood sample in a vial or tube, to be submitted to a laboratory for testing and diagnosis of diseases.  64.65(2)    Injection.  Injection shall mean the injection of tuberculin into a prescribed area of the animal as a diagnostic test for tuberculosis.  64.65(3)    Reading.  Reading shall mean the examination of the injection site to ascertain whether or not there has been a reaction. A reaction at the injection site is a positive diagnosis of tuberculosis.  64.65(4)    Stop.  Stop shall mean a personal visit at a particular farm for the expressed purpose of testing animals for tuberculosis or brucellosis, for reading animals for tuberculosis, or for tagging and branding animals diagnosed as having tuberculosis or brucellosis.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.66    Reserved.ERADICATION OF SWINE BRUCELLOSIS21—64.67(163A)  Brucellosis test.  When reactor animals are revealed on any test, the herd of origin and all exposed animals shall be placed under quarantine and inspections and tests performed as provided in Iowa Code chapter 163A.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163A.12.21—64.68(163A)  Veterinarians to test.  The department will designate a federal or state veterinarian or it may designate a licensed accredited veterinarian to make the inspections and tests. The expense of the tests may be charged to the county brucellosis eradication fund as provided in Iowa Code section 163A.12.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163A.12.21—64.69    Reserved.21—64.70    Reserved.21—64.71(163A)  Fee schedule.    64.71(1)    Bleeding.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and five dollars per head for all animals bled.  64.71(2)    Tagging of reactors.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and two dollars per head for all swine tagged.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163A.12.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.72    Reserved.ERADICATION OF BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS21—64.73(163)  Tuberculin tests classified.  Tuberculin tests adopted by the department of agriculture and land stewardship are:  64.73(1)  The subcutaneous or “Thermal” test.  64.73(2)  The intradermic or “Skin” test.  64.73(3)  The ophthalmic or “Eye” test.  64.73(4)  The TB Stat-Pak test for cervids.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.13.Related ARC(s): 0656C21—64.74(163)  Acceptance of intradermic test.  The intradermic tuberculin test will be accepted provided it has been applied by a regularly employed state or federal veterinarian, an accredited veterinarian or by an approved veterinarian when endorsed by the authorities of the state of origin, provided the observations be made at the seventy-second hour.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.75(163)  Adoption of intradermic test.  The intradermic test is hereby adopted for area tuberculosis eradication work.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.76(163)  Ophthalmic test.  The ophthalmic test will not be accepted as an official test except when applied in combination with either the subcutaneous or intradermic test.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.77(163)  Tuberculin test deadline.  All tuberculin tests must be made within 30 days of date of shipment.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.4.21—64.78(163)  Health certificate.  All certificates of health must show the number of cattle included in the test, the name of the owner and the post-office address.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.7.21—64.79(163)  Ear tags.  All cattle not identified by registration name and number shall be identified by a proper metal tag bearing a serial number attached to the right ear.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 164.11.21—64.80(163)  Cattle importation.  No cattle shall be imported into the state of Iowa except in accordance with 21—65.4(163).This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.11 and 165.36.21—64.81(163)  Tuberculin reactors.  All herds of breeding cattle in counties that are under state and federal supervision for the eradication of tuberculosis in which reactors have been found may be held in quarantine until they have passed a negative tuberculin test.All cattle that react to the tuberculin test, as well as those which show physical evidence of tuberculosis, shall be marked for identification by branding with the letter “T” not less than two or more than three inches high on the hip near the tailhead, and to the left ear shall be attached a metal tag bearing a serial number and the inscription “REACTOR”.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.4.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.82(163)  Steers—testing.  All untested steer cattle shall be handled and maintained as a separate unit from the breeding cattle (which means they shall be quarantined, watered and fed apart from breeding cattle).This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1 and 164.4.21—64.83(163)  Female cattle—testing.  Female cattle, the products of which are intended for family use, may be tuberculin tested without being denied the use of the same pastures and the same watering troughs as steers in feeding. This does not apply to female cattle, the products of which are handled commercially; neither does it apply where the feeding cattle are other than steers. Cows kept under such conditions cannot be sold for any purpose other than slaughter without being subjected to an additional tuberculin test.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1 and 164.4.21—64.84(163)  Certificates and test charts.  Certificates and test charts must be made to conform with United States Bureau of Animal Industry rules governing the interstate movement of cattle; the original must be attached to the waybill and a copy forwarded to the Chief of Division of Animal Industry, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Des Moines, Iowa 50319.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 163.1 and 164.4.21—64.85(163)  Slaughtering reactors.  Reactors to the tuberculin test brought in for immediate slaughter must be consigned to a slaughtering establishment having federal inspection and must be transported thereto in accordance with section V, Regulation 7, of B.A.I. Order No.309.  64.85(1)  When it is found on slaughter that animals are affected with tuberculosis, the chief, division of animal industry, may order an immediate investigation, and if deemed advisable have all breeding cattle on the premises from which the tubercular animals originated, tested for tuberculosis.  64.85(2)  When cattle within the state of Iowa are sold under sale contract to pass a 60- or 90-day tuberculin test and have failed to pass the same, before being returned to the original owner, the party wishing to return such animal or animals shall first obtain a permit from the chief, division of animal industry, Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship, to do so.  64.85(3)  When cattle are sold out of the state of Iowa under sale contract to pass a 60- or 90-day tuberculin test and failing to pass the same, before being returned to the original owner, the party wishing to return such animal or animals shall first furnish a tuberculin test chart showing the reaction, giving the date of reaction and proving to the satisfaction of the chief, division of animal industry, that such animals are reactors.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.4.21—64.86(163)  Agriculture tuberculin rules.  The rules adopted by the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship governing the establishment of tuberculosis-free accredited herds and accredited areas or units in Iowa will be applied to such herds, and areas or units in cooperation with the bureau of animal industry, United States department of agriculture.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.12.21—64.87(163)  “Tuberculosis-free accredited herd” defined.  A tuberculosis-free accredited herd is one which has been tuberculin tested by the subcutaneous method or any other test approved by the bureau of animal industry, under the supervision of the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship and the United States department of agriculture or a veterinary inspector employed by the state in which cooperative tuberculosis eradication work is being conducted jointly by the United States department of agriculture and the state. Further, it shall be a herd in which no animal affected with tuberculosis has been found upon two annual or three semiannual tuberculin tests, as above described, and by physical examination.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.12.21—64.88(163)  Retesting.  The entire herd, or any cattle in the herd, shall be tuberculin tested or retested at such time as is considered necessary by the federal or state authorities.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.32.21—64.89(163)  Accredited herd.  No herd shall be classed as an accredited herd, in which tuberculosis has been found by the application of the test as referred to in 21—64.63(163), until such herd has been successfully subjected to two consecutive tests with tuberculin applied at intervals of not less than six months, the first interval dating from the time of removal of the tuberculous animals from the herd.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.12.21—64.90(163)  Selection of cattle for tuberculin tests.  No cattle shall be presented for the tuberculin test which have been injected with tuberculin within 60 days immediately preceding or which have at any time reacted to a tuberculin test.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 165.10, 165.13 and 165.26.21—64.91(163)  Identification for test.  Prior to each tuberculin test satisfactory evidence of the identity of the registered animal shall be presented to the inspector. Any grade cattle maintained in the herd or associated with the animals of the herd shall be identified by a tag or other marking satisfactory to the state and federal officials.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.92(163)  Removing cattle from herd.  All removals of cattle from the herd, either by sale, death or slaughter, shall be reported promptly to the said state or federal officials, giving the identification of the animal, and if sold, the name and address of the person to whom transferred. If the transfer is made from the accredited herd to another accredited herd the shipment shall be made in only cleaned and disinfected cars. No cattle which have not passed a tuberculin test approved by the state and federal officials shall be allowed to associate with the herd.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.93(163)  Milk.  All milk and other dairy products fed to calves shall be that produced by an accredited herd, or if from outside or unknown sources it shall be pasteurized by heating to not less than 150° F. for not less than 20 minutes.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.94(163)  Sanitary measures.  All reasonable sanitary measures and other recommendations by the state and federal authorities for the control of tuberculosis shall be complied with.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.95(163)  Interstate shipment.  Cattle from an accredited herd may be shipped interstate on certificate obtained from the office of the chief, division of animal industry, or from the office of the bureau of animal industry without further tuberculin test, for a period of one year, subject to the rules of the state of destination.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.36.21—64.96(163)  Reactors—removal.  All cattle which react to the tuberculin test and for which the owner desires indemnity, as provided by statute, must be removed immediately from the cattle barn, lots and pastures where other cattle are being kept.  64.96(1)  The barn or place where reacting cattle have been housed or kept shall be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected immediately.  64.96(2)  Feed places and floors must be cleared of all hay and manure and scraped clean.  64.96(3)  All loose boards and decayed woodwork should be removed, and when deemed necessary, and requested by the veterinarian, must be accomplished before it will be considered that the place has been properly cleaned and disinfected.  64.96(4)  The feeding places, troughs, floors and partitions near the floor should be washed and scoured with hot water and lye.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 163.1.21—64.97(163)  Certificate.  Strict compliance with these methods and rules shall entitle the owner of tuberculosis-free herds to a certificate, “TUBERCULOSIS-FREE ACCREDITED HERD”, to be issued by the United States Department of Agriculture, bureau of animal industry and the division of animal industry, Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship. Said certificate shall be good for one year from date of test unless revoked at an earlier date.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.12.21—64.98(163)  Violation of certificate.  Failure on the part of the owners to comply with the letter or spirit of these methods and rules shall be considered sufficient cause for immediate cancellation of the cooperative agreement with them by the state and federal officials.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.12.21—64.99(163)  Tuberculin—administration.  In accordance with the provisions of Iowa Code chapter 165, the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship shall have control of the sale, distribution and use of all tuberculin used in the state and shall formulate regulations for its distribution and use. Only such persons as are authorized by the department, inspectors of the B.A.I. and regularly licensed practicing veterinary surgeons of the state of Iowa shall be entitled to administer tuberculin to any animal included within the meaning of this chapter.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.13.21—64.100(163)  Sale of tuberculin.  No person, firm or corporation shall sell or distribute tuberculin to any person or persons in the state of Iowa except under the following conditions:  64.100(1)  That the person or persons are legally authorized to administer tuberculin.  64.100(2)  That all sales of tuberculin shall be reported to the secretary of agriculture on proper forms, which forms may be obtained from the chief, division of animal industry.  64.100(3)  Reports of all sales and distribution of tuberculin in the state of Iowa shall be made in triplicate; the original copy to be delivered with the tuberculin to the person obtaining same; the duplicate to be forwarded to the Chief, Division of Animal Industry, Des Moines, Iowa 50319; and the triplicate copy to be retained by the manufacturer or distributor. All reports shall be made within 60 days from date of sale.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.12.21—64.101(165)  Fee schedule.    64.101(1)    Injection.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and two dollars per head.  64.101(2)    Reading.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and two dollars per head.  64.101(3)    Tagging and branding reactors.  Five dollars first reactor and three dollars each additional reactor.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 165.17.Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.102    Reserved.21—64.103    Reserved.CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD)21—64.104(163)  Definitions.  Definitions used in rules 21—64.104(163) through 21—64.119(163) are as follows:
    "Accredited veterinarian" means a veterinarian approved by the deputy administrator of veterinary services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the state veterinarian in accordance with Part 161 of Title 9, Chapter 1, of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 9, 2013, to perform functions required by cooperative state/federal animal disease control and eradication programs.
    "Adjacent herd" means one of the following:
    1. A herd of Cervidae occupying premises that border an affected herd, including herds separated by roads or streams.
    2. A herd of Cervidae occupying premises that were previously occupied by an affected herd within the past four years as determined by the designated epidemiologist.
    "Affected cervid herd" means a cervid herd from which any animal has been diagnosed as affected with CWD and which has not been in compliance with the control program for CWD as described in rules 21—64.104(163) through 21—64.119(163).
    "Certificate" means an official document, issued by a state veterinarian or federal animal health official or an accredited veterinarian at the point of origin, containing information on the individual identification of each animal being moved, the number of animals, the purpose of the movement, the points of origin and destination, the consignor, the consignee, and any other information required by the state veterinarian.
    "Certified CWD cervid herd" means a herd of Cervidae that has met the qualifications for and has been issued a certified CWD cervid herd certificate signed by the state veterinarian.
    "Cervidae" means all animals belonging to the Cervidae family.
    "Cervid CWD surveillance identification program" "CCWDSI program" means a CWD surveillance program that requires identification and laboratory diagnosis on all deaths of Cervidae 12 months of age and older including, but not limited to, deaths by slaughter, hunting, illness, and injury. A copy of official laboratory reports shall be maintained by the owner for purposes of completion of the annual inventory examination for recertification. Such diagnosis shall include examination of brain and any other tissue as directed by the state veterinarian. If there are deaths for which tissues were not submitted for laboratory diagnosis due to postmortem changes or unavailability, the department shall determine compliance.
    "Cervid dealer" means any person who engages in the business of buying, selling, trading, or negotiating the transfer of Cervidae, but not a person who purchases Cervidae exclusively for slaughter on the person’s own premises or buys and sells as part of a normal livestock production operation.
    "Cervid herd" means a group of Cervidae or one or more groups of Cervidae maintained on common ground or under common ownership or supervision that are geographically separated but can have interchange or movement.
    "Cervid herd of origin" means a cervid herd, or any farm or other premises, where the animals were born or where they currently reside.
    "Chronic wasting disease" "CWD" means a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids.
    "CWD affected" means a designation applied to Cervidae diagnosed as affected with CWD based on laboratory results, clinical signs, or epidemiologic investigation.
    "CWD exposed" "exposed" means a designation applied to Cervidae that are either part of an affected herd or for which epidemiological investigation indicates contact with CWD affected animals, contact with animals from a CWD affected herd or contact with a contaminated premises in the past five years.
    "CWD susceptible Cervidae" means whitetail deer, blacktail deer, mule deer, red deer, elk, moose, and related species and hybrids of these species.
    "CWD suspect" "suspect" means a designation applied to Cervidae for which laboratory evidence or clinical signs suggest a diagnosis of CWD but for which laboratory results are inconclusive.
    "Designated epidemiologist" means a veterinarian who has demonstrated the knowledge and ability to perform the functions required under these rules and who has been selected by the state veterinarian.
    "Group" means one or more Cervidae.
    "Individual herd plan" means a written herd management and testing plan that is designed by the herd owner, the owner’s veterinarian, if requested, and a designated epidemiologist to identify and eradicate CWD from an affected, exposed, or adjacent herd.
    "Monitored CWD cervid herd" means a herd of Cervidae that is in compliance with the CCWDSI program as defined in this rule. Monitored herds are defined as one-year, two-year, three-year, four-year, and five-year monitored herds in accordance with the time in years such herds have been in compliance with the CCWDSI program.
    "Official cervid CWD test" means an approved test to diagnose CWD conducted at an official laboratory.
    "Official cervid identification" means one of the following:
    1. A USDA-approved identification ear tag that conforms to the alphanumeric national uniform ear tagging system as defined in 9 CFR Part 71.1, Chapter 1, revised as of January 9, 2013.
    2. A plastic or other material tag that includes the official herd number issued by the USDA, and includes individual animal identification which is no more than five digits and is unique for each animal.
    3. A legible tattoo which includes the official herd number issued by the USDA, and includes individual animal identification which is no more than five digits and is unique for each animal.
    "Official laboratory" means a USDA-approved American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) accredited laboratory or the National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, Iowa.
    "Permit" means an official document that is issued by the state veterinarian or USDA area veterinarian-in-charge or an accredited veterinarian for movement of affected, suspect, or exposed animals.
    "Quarantine" means an imposed restriction prohibiting movement of cervids to any location without specific written permits.
    "State" means any state of the United States; the District of Columbia; Puerto Rico; the U.S. Virgin Islands; or Guam.
    "Traceback" means the process of identifying the herd of origin of CCWDSI-positive animals, including herds that were sold for slaughter.
    Related ARC(s): 0391C, 1024C21—64.105(163)  Supervision of the cervid CWD surveillance identification program.  The state veterinarian’s office will conduct an annual inventory of Cervidae in a herd enrolled in the CCWDSI program.21—64.106(163)  Surveillance procedures.  For cervid herds enrolled in this voluntary certification program, surveillance procedures shall include the following:  64.106(1)    Slaughter establishments.  All slaughtered Cervidae 12 months of age and older must have brain tissue submitted at slaughter and examined for CWD by an official laboratory. This brain tissue sample will be obtained by a state or federal meat inspector or accredited veterinarian on the premises at the time of slaughter.  64.106(2)    Cervid herds.  All cervid herds must be under continuous surveillance for CWD as defined in the CCWDSI program.  64.106(3)    Identification.  All cervid animals must receive the identification before 12 months of age and be identified with either:  a.  Two forms of official cervid identification, or  b.  One form of official cervid identification along with either a state-approved tag or a tag from the North American Elk Breeders Association or North American Deer Farmers Association.Related ARC(s): 0391C, 1024C21—64.107(163)  Official cervid tests.  The following are recognized as official cervid tests for CWD:
    1. Histopathology.
    2. Immunohistochemistry.
    3. Western blot.
    4. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
    5. Any other tests performed by an official laboratory to confirm a diagnosis of CWD.
    Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.108(163)  Investigation of CWD affected animals identified through surveillance.  Traceback must be performed for all animals diagnosed at an official laboratory as affected with CWD. All herds of origin and all adjacent herds having contact with affected animals as determined by the CCWDSI program must be investigated epidemiologically. All herds of origin, adjacent herds, and herds having contact with affected animals or exposed animals must be quarantined. The department will investigate CWD suspect herds.Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.109(163)  Duration of quarantine.  Quarantines placed in accordance with these rules must maintain compliance with rules 21—64.104(163) through 21—64.119(163). Quarantines maintaining compliance shall be removed after five years from the date of the last CWD detected test or after all animals have died or been depopulated and have been tested without the detection of CWD.Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.110(163)  Herd plan.  The herd owner, the owner’s veterinarian, if requested, and the epidemiologist shall develop a plan for eradicating CWD in each affected herd. The plan must be designed to reduce and then eliminate CWD from the herd, to prevent spread of the disease to other herds, and to prevent reintroduction of CWD after the herd becomes a certified CWD cervid herd. Animals that die, are depopulated, or are otherwise killed must be tested for CWD. The herd plan must be developed and signed within 60 days after the determination that the herd is affected. The plan must address herd management and adhere to rules 21—64.104(163) through 21—64.119(163). The plan must be formalized as a memorandum of agreement between the owner and program officials, must be approved by the state veterinarian, and must include plans to obtain certified CWD cervid herd status. No movement restrictions may be removed prior to formalization of the agreement.Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.111(163)  Identification and disposal requirements.  Affected and exposed animals must remain on the premises where they are found until they are identified and disposed of in accordance with direction from the state veterinarian. The department and the Iowa department of natural resources shall approve disposal issues of affected and exposed animals including manner and site.Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.112(163)  Cleaning and disinfecting.  Premises must be cleaned and disinfected under state supervision within 15 days after affected animals have been removed.21—64.113(163)  Methods for obtaining certified CWD cervid herd status.  Certified CWD cervid herd status must include all Cervidae under common ownership. The animals that are part of a certified herd cannot be commingled with other cervids that are not certified, and a minimum geographic separation of 30 feet between herds of different status must be maintained in accordance with the USDA Uniform Methods and Rules as defined in APHIS Manual 91-45-011, revised as of January 22, 1999. The escape, disappearance or death of any cervid shall be promptly reported along with identification numbers and estimated time of escape, disappearance or death. Tissue samples shall be available. A herd may qualify for status as a certified CWD cervid herd by one of the following means:  64.113(1)  Purchasing a certified CWD cervid herd. Upon request and with proof of purchase, the department shall issue a new certificate in the new owner’s name. The anniversary date and herd status for the purchased animals shall be the same as for the herd to which the animals are added; or if part or all of the purchased herd is moved directly to premises that have no other Cervidae, the herd may retain the certified CWD status of the herd of origin. The anniversary date of the new herd is the date of the most recent herd certification status certificate.  64.113(2)  Upon request and with proof by records, a herd owner shall be issued a certified CWD cervid herd certificate by complying with the CCWDSI program for a period of five years.Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.114(163)  Recertification of CWD cervid herds.  A herd is certified for 12 months. Annual inventories conducted by the department, a state-authorized veterinarian, or authorized federal personnel are required every 9 to 15 months from the anniversary date. A complete physical herd inventory will be completed by the department, a state-authorized veterinarian, or authorized federal personnel every three years. For continuous certification, adherence to the provisions in these rules and all other state laws and rules pertaining to raising cervids is required. A herd’s certification status is immediately terminated and a herd investigation shall be initiated if CWD affected or exposed animals are determined to originate from that herd.Related ARC(s): 1024C21—64.115(163)  Movement into a certified CWD cervid herd.    64.115(1)  Animals originating from certified CWD cervid herds may move into another certified CWD cervid herd with no change in the status of the herd of destination.  64.115(2)  The movement of animals originating from noncertified or lesser status herds into certified CWD cervid herds will result in the redesignation of the herd of destination to the lesser status.21—64.116(163)  Movement into a monitored CWD cervid herd.    64.116(1)  Animals originating from a monitored CWD cervid herd may move into another monitored CWD cervid herd of the same status.  64.116(2)  The movement of animals originating from a herd which is not a monitored CWD cervid herd or from a lower status monitored CWD cervid herd will result in the redesignation of the herd of destination to the lesser status.21—64.117(163)  Recognition of monitored CWD cervid herds.  The state veterinarian shall issue a monitored CWD cervid herd certificate, including CWD monitored herd status as CWD monitored Level 1 during the first calendar year, CWD monitored Level 2 during the second calendar year, CWD monitored Level 3 during the third calendar year, CWD monitored Level 4 during the fourth calendar year, CWD monitored Level 5 during the fifth calendar year, and CWD certification at the completion of the fifth year and thereafter.21—64.118(163)  Recognition of certified CWD cervid herds.  The state veterinarian shall issue a certified CWD cervid herd certificate when the herd first qualifies for certification. The state veterinarian shall issue a renewal form annually.21—64.119(163)  Effective period.  Rescinded IAB 9/14/05, effective 8/16/05.These rules are intended to implement Iowa Code chapter 163 and Iowa Code Supplement chapter 170.21—64.120    Reserved.21—64.121    Reserved.21—64.122    Reserved.21—64.123    Reserved.21—64.124    Reserved.21—64.125    Reserved.21—64.126    Reserved.21—64.127    Reserved.21—64.128    Reserved.21—64.129    Reserved.21—64.130    Reserved.21—64.131    Reserved.21—64.132    Reserved.ERADICATION OF SWINE TUBERCULOSIS21—64.133(159)  Indemnity.  Indemnity may be paid for losses incurred by slaughtering establishments in the event native Iowa swine purchased by the establishments for immediate slaughter are determined to have tuberculosis by the official meat inspector at the establishment, subject to laboratory confirmation at the discretion of the department by any laboratory procedure acceptable to the department. Indemnity will be paid by the county of origin of the swine provided that swine shall be identified to the farm of origin located in that county. If no identification can be established on swine no indemnity may be paid.If the county bovine tuberculosis eradication funds are insufficient, the claim may be filed and may be paid in subsequent years.Indemnity will be paid to the producer of swine only after proof of cleaning and disinfecting of premises has been established.If a herd of swine is tested for tuberculosis at program expense authorization must be given by an official of the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code sections 159.5 and 163.15.21—64.134(159)  Fee schedule.    64.134(1)    Injection.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and two dollars per head.  64.134(2)    Reading.  Thirty dollars per stop (herd) and one dollar per head.  64.134(3)    Tagging.  Five dollars for first reactor and one dollar for each additional reactor.This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 159.5(13).Related ARC(s): 9102B21—64.135    Reserved.21—64.136    Reserved.21—64.137    Reserved.21—64.138    Reserved.21—64.139    Reserved.21—64.140    Reserved.21—64.141    Reserved.21—64.142    Reserved.21—64.143    Reserved.21—64.144    Reserved.21—64.145    Reserved.21—64.146    Reserved.PSEUDORABIES DISEASE21—64.147(163, 166D)  Definitions. As used in these rules:  
    "All-in-all-out" means a management system whereby feeder swine are handled in groups kept “separate and apart” from other groups in a production facility. These groups are removed from the production facility with the completely vacated area being cleaned and sanitized prior to the introduction of another group.
    "Aujeszky’s disease," commonly known as pseudorabies, means the disease wherein an animal is infected with Aujeszky’s disease virus, irrespective of the occurrence or absence of clinical symptoms.
    "Breeding swine" means boars, sows and gilts used, or intended for use, exclusively for reproductive purposes.
    "Department" means the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship.
    "Exigent circumstances" means an extraordinary situation that the secretary concludes will impose an unjust and undue economic hardship if coupled with the imposition of these rules.
    "Fertility center" means a premises where breeding swine are maintained for the purposes of the collection of semen, ovum, or other germplasm and for the distribution of semen, ovum, or other germplasm to other swine herds.
    "Herd" means any group of swine maintained for 60 days or more on common ground for any purpose, or two or more groups of swine that have been intermingled without regard to pseudorabies status and are under common ownership or possession and that have been geographically separated within the state of Iowa. Two or more groups of swine are assumed to be one herd, unless an investigation by the epidemiologist has determined that intermingling and contact between groups has not occurred.
    "Low incidence state/area" means a state or subdivision of a state with little or no incidence of pseudorabies and which qualifies for Stage III, or higher, and has been designated Stage III, or higher, by the National Pseudorabies Control Board as defined in the State/Federal Industry Program Standards for pseudorabies eradication; or an area outside the United States with a low incidence of pseudorabies determined by at least an equivalent testing protocol as is used to establish Stage III status.
    "Native Iowa feeder pig" means a feeder pig farrowed in Iowa, and always located in Iowa.
    "Premises" means a parcel of land together with buildings, enclosures and facilities sufficient for swine production.
    "Restricted movement" means movement of swine in accordance with 2000 Iowa Acts, Senate File 2312, section 17.
    "Vicinity" means a distance less than one-half mile.
    21—64.148(163, 166C)  Pseudorabies tests and reports.  Rescinded IAB 9/6/89, effective 10/11/89.21—64.149(163, 166C)  Approval of qualified pseudorabies negative herd.  Rescinded IAB 9/6/89, effective 10/11/89.21—64.150(163, 166C)  Shipment of breeding swine and feeder pigs.  Rescinded IAB 9/6/89, effective 10/11/89.21—64.151(163, 166D)  Quarantines.    64.151(1)  Except for sales to slaughter or to pseudorabies-approved premises, owners of animals tested for pseudorabies shall hold the entire herd on the premises until results are determined.  64.151(2)  Infected herds not on an approved cleanup plan. All known pseudorabies infected herds, not on an approved herd cleanup plan, are subject to restricted movement to slaughter according to 64.154(2)“c” and 64.155(8).  64.151(3)  Quarantine releasing procedures.  a.  A heard of swine shall no longer be classified as a known infected herd after removal of all positive swine and at least one of the following three conditions have been met:  (1)  All swine have been removed and the premises have been cleaned and disinfected and maintained free of swine for 30 days or a period of time determined adequate by an official pseudorabies epidemiologist.  (2)  All swine seropositive to an official test have been removed and all remaining swine, except suckling pigs, are tested and found negative 30 days or more after removal of the seropositive animals.  (3)  All swine seropositive to an official test have been removed, and all breeding swine that remain in the herd and an official random sample consisting of at least 30 animals from each segregated group of grower-finisher swine over two months of age are tested and found negative 30 days or more after removal of the seropositive animals. A second test of grower-finisher swine at least 30 days after the first test is required.  b.  In nurseries and finishing herds without any breeding swine and where no pigs are received from quarantined premises, quarantines may be released as follows:  (1)  A negative official random-sample test consisting of at least 30 animals from each segregated group, conducted at least 30 days following depopulation with cleaning and disinfection of the premises and 7 days’ downtime, or  (2)  A negative official random-sample test consisting of at least 30 animals from each segregated group, conducted at least 30 days following a similar negative official random-sample test.A similar official random-sample test must then be conducted between 60 and 90 days following quarantine release.Any quarantine releasing procedure deviating from the above procedures or Iowa Code section 166D.9 must be approved by the official pseudorabies epidemiologist and the state veterinarian.21—64.152(163, 166D)  Nondifferentiable pseudorabies vaccine disapproved.  The only pseudorabies vaccine or pseudorabies vaccine combination used in this state shall be a differentiable vaccine.After July 1, 1993, this vaccine must be differentiable by a licensed and approved differentiable pseudorabies test capable of determining gp1 negative swine vaccinated with a gp1 gene deleted vaccine.21—64.153(166D)  Pseudorabies disease program areas.    64.153(1)  Pseudorabies disease program areas as declared by the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship: all counties in the state of Iowa.  64.153(2)  All producers will permit sufficient swine in their herds to be tested at program expense to determine the health status of the herd at intervals during the course of the program as deemed necessary by the department.The owner shall confine the swine to be tested in a suitable place and restrain them in a suitable manner so that the proper tests can be applied. If the owner refuses to confine and restrain the swine, after reasonable time the department may employ sufficient help to properly confine and restrain them and the expense of such help shall be paid by the owner.The swine tested shall be sufficient in number, and by method of selection, to quality for the surveillance program required to attain and maintain the program stages according to the most recent “State-Federal-Industry Program Standards” for pseudorabies eradication.  64.153(3)  No indemnities will be paid for condemned animals.  64.153(4)  Any person possessing swine is required to provide the name and address of the owner or the owner’s agent to a representative of the department.  64.153(5)  Beginning on October 1, 1999, all swine located within three miles of a pseudorabies-infected herd are required to be vaccinated with an approved pseudorabies vaccine within seven days of notification by a regulatory official. One dose of vaccine shall be administered to growing swine prior to 14 weeks of age or 100 pounds. Swine over six months of age or greater than 200 pounds, used or intended to be used for breeding, shall receive vaccine on a schedule designed to administer at least four doses throughout a 12-month period. The department may require a herd test to monitor both the pseudorabies status and the pseudorabies vaccine status of the herd.A waiver for this vaccination requirement may be issued by the state veterinarian, based on epidemiological investigation and risk determination. Herd testing, at a level determined by the pseudorabies epidemiologist, will be required as a condition for issuance of a vaccination waiver.In addition, beginning April 19, 2000, all swine located in a county designated as in Stage II of the national pseudorabies eradication program are required to be vaccinated with a modified-live differentiable vaccine. Breeding swine shall at a minimum receive quarterly vaccinations. Feeder swine shall at a minimum receive one vaccination administered when the swine reach 8 to 12 weeks of age or 100 pounds. These vaccination requirements shall be waived if:  a.  The swine are part of a herd’s being continuously maintained as a qualified negative herd; or  b.  The swine are part of a herd located within a county where both of the following conditions apply:  (1)  The department has determined that the county has a six-month history of 0 percent prevalence of pseudorabies infection among all herds in the county, and  (2)  All contiguous counties have a 0 percent prevalence of pseudorabies infection among herds in that county.  64.153(6)  All premises containing swine which are located in the Stage II area of Iowa must have a monitoring test for the premises conducted between January 1, 2000, and August 31, 2000.21—64.154(163, 166D)  Identification.    64.154(1)  All breeding and feeder swine being exhibited or having a change of ownership must be identified by a method approved by the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship. The identification shall be applied by the owner, the pig dealer, or the livestock dealer at the farm of origin or by the pig dealer or the livestock dealer at the first concentration point.  64.154(2)  Approved identification.  a.    Breeding swine.    (1)  Ear tags or tattoos with an alphabetic or numeric system to provide unique identification for each animal.  (2)  Ear notches or ear tattoos, if applied according to the standard breed registry system.  (3)  Electronic devices, other devices, or marks which, when applied, will permanently and uniquely identify each animal.  (4)  Breeding swine qualified to move intrastate without individual tests may move without unique identification of each animal, if they are all identified as a group to the herd of origin by an official premises tattoo.  b.    Feeder swine.    (1)  Ear tags or tattoos with an alphabetic or numeric system to provide unique identification with each herd, each lot, or each individual swine.  (2)  Electronic devices, other devices, or marks which, when applied, will provide permanent identification with each herd, each lot, or each individual swine.  c.    Restricted movement swine.    (1)  All infected herds not on an approved herd cleanup plan shall only move swine directly to slaughter by restricted movement. All animals from infected herds must move by restricted movement to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point) or to an approved premises detailed in the herd cleanup plan. The department may, until a herd plan is approved and showing progress, require the movement of all slaughter swine by “direct movement,” to slaughter only, by a Permit for Restricted Movement to Slaughter which provides a description of the animals, the owner, the consignee, the date of movement, the destination, and the identification or vehicle seal number if applicable. These “restricted movement to slaughter only swine” shall be individually identified by approved metal ear tags applied at the farm of origin, if required. The transportation vehicle must be sealed at the farm of origin. This seal shall be applied by an accredited veterinarian. This seal shall be removed by an accredited veterinarian, USDA official, department official, or the person purchasing the swine upon arrival of the consignment at the destination indicated on the Permit for Restricted Movement to Slaughter.The ear tags shall have an alphabetic or numeric numbering system to provide unique identification with each herd, each lot, or each individual swine. They shall be applied prior to movement and listed on the Permit for Restricted Movement to Slaughter, if required. This Permit for Restricted Movement to Slaughter shall be issued and distributed by an accredited veterinarian as follows:
    1. Original to accompany shipment.
    2. Mail a copy to the department.
    3. Veterinarian issuing permit will retain a copy.
      (2)  The vehicle sealing requirement may be waived by the department. Written application for waiver must be directed to the state veterinarian’s office, and written waivers may be granted for herds in compliance with an approved herd cleanup plan. The minimal requirements for granting a waiver shall be:
    1. No clinical disease in the herd for the past 30 days.
    2. Complete herd vaccination documentation.
    3. Compliance with herd plan testing requirements.
    4. Concurrence of herd veterinarian and regulatory district veterinarian.
    No waiver shall be granted, and waivers already granted shall be voided, for herds still classified as infected four months from the initial infection date. The department may impose additional requirements on a case-by-case basis.The department may grant an extension to this waiver for a period of up to four additional months on a case-by-case basis. Written application for waiver extension must be directed to the state veterinarian’s office, and written waivers may be granted for herds in compliance with an approved herd cleanup plan.
      64.154(3)  Approved ear tags available from the Iowa department of agriculture and land stewardship:  a.  Pink tags to identify pseudorabies vaccinated swine.  b.  Silver tags to identify feeder pigs from pseudorabies noninfected herds.  c.  Blue tags to identify other swine.  64.154(4)  Farm-to-farm movement of native Iowa feeder pigs.  a.  Native Iowa feeder pigs sold and moved farm-to-farm within the state are exempt from identification requirements if the owner transferring possession and the person taking possession agree in writing that the feeder pigs will not be commingled with other swine for a period of 30 days. The owner transferring possession shall provide a copy of the agreement to the person taking possession of the feeder pigs.  b.  “Moved farm-to-farm” as used in this rule means feeder pigs farrowed and raised in Iowa by a farm owner or operator and sold to another farm owner or operator who agree, in writing, not to commingle these pigs for at least 30 days.Feeder pigs purchased for resale by a pig dealer cannot be moved farm-to-farm, as described in the above paragraph. They must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection and be identified.  c.  Identification-exempt feeder pigs must originate from a “monitored,” or other “noninfected,” herd. The “monitored herd” number, or other qualifying number, and the date of expiration must also be shown on the Certificate of Inspection.All identification-exempt feeder pigs aboard the transport vehicle must be from the same farm of origin and be the only pigs aboard. They must be kept in “isolation” and transported by “direct movement” to the farm of destination.  d.  The veterinarian will certify, by signature on the Certificate of Inspection, that the above conditions have been met and that the pigs are exempt from the identification requirements and will qualify for movement according to 64.155(4).  64.154(5)  Swine being relocated intrastate without a change of ownership are exempt from health certification, identification requirements, and transportation certification except as required by Iowa Code chapter 172B provided relocation records sufficient to determine the origin, the current pseudorabies status of the herd of origin, the number relocated, the date relocated, and destination of the relocated swine are available for inspection.Swine relocated within a herd held on multiple premises are exempted from this health certification, identification requirement, and transportation certification, except as required by Iowa Code chapter 172B and the above record-keeping requirements.Relocation records, if required, shall be maintained and available for inspection for a minimum of two years.  64.154(6)  This rule should not be construed to implement or affect the identification requirements set down in Iowa Code sections 163.34, 163.35, 163.36, and 163.37. Records of identification applied to slaughter swine at concentration points shall be reported weekly to the department on forms provided by the department.
    21—64.155(163, 166D, 172B)  Certificates of inspection.  The following certificates shall be used as outlined. All are provided by the department. All require inspection by a licensed accredited veterinarian.  64.155(1)  Iowa origin Interstate Certificates of Veterinary Inspection shall be used for exporting breeding swine or feeder swine out of the state.  64.155(2)  Intrastate Certificates of Veterinary Inspection shall be used for the following movements:  a.  The intrastate movement of feeder swine, with a change of ownership, originating from noninfected herds requires approved identification and noninfected herd identification number, showing the date of last test on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The feeder swine shall be quarantined for 30 days.  b.  The intrastate movement, with a change of ownership, of breeding swine from nonquarantined herds requires approved identification and noninfected herd number, or individual test results and dates tested included on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection only. The breeding swine shall be quarantined for 30 days.  c.  The concentration points to farm movement of feeder swine originating from noninfected herds requires approved identification and herd identification number and date tested included on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The feeder swine shall be quarantined for 30 days.  d.  The concentration point to farm intrastate movement of noninfected breeding swine from nonquarantined herds requires approved identification and noninfected herd number or individual test results and dates tested included on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The breeding swine shall be quarantined for 30 days.  e.  The farm to an approved premises or from a concentration point to an approved premises movement of feeder swine requires approved identification and approved premises number to be included on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. A statement, “Quarantined until slaughter,” shall be included on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.  f.  Movement of exhibition swine to an exhibition when a certificate is required must be with a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.  64.155(3)  QLSM certificate. A QLSM certificate shall be used when moving swine under restricted movement and quarantined until moved to slaughter. The certificate shall be used for the following movements:  a.  Movement of feeder swine from quarantined herds to approved premises. Approved identification and approved premises number shall be included on the certificate. The swine are quarantined to slaughter or can be moved to another approved premises on a certificate of inspection.  b.  Movement of feeder swine from herds of unknown status, feeder pig cooperator herd plans, or herd cleanup plans. Approved identification shall be included on the certificate. This certificate is used for farm-to-farm or concentration point to farm movements.  64.155(4)  A Farm-to-Farm Certificate of Veterinary Inspection or an Intrastate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection shall be used for moving identification-exempt native Iowa feeder pigs farm-to-farm according to 64.154(4)“b.” Feeder swine purchased for resale by a pig dealer must be identified and accompanied by a Certificate of Inspection.  64.155(5)  Import Interstate Certificates from out-of-state origins shall accompany shipments of breeding swine and feeder swine into Iowa.  a.  Feeder swine: If a state of origin does not issue a monitored herd number, then the certificate shall include the statement, “These pigs are from a noninfected herd and the date of last test was ____________,” or “These pigs are from a monitored herd tested within the last 12 months. Date of last test was ____________.” The certificate shall include the following statement: “These feeder pigs are quarantined until moved to slaughter.”  b.  Breeding swine: Individual test results and date tested or noninfected herd number and date of last test shall be included on the certificate.  c.  Feeder swine from low incidence state/area of origin. The certificate shall include the following statements, “These pigs were born and raised in the state/area of ____________,” (state/area name) and “These feeder pigs are quarantined until moved to slaughter.”  d.  Beginning January 1, 1998, all imported feeder swine, except those from qualified negative herds entering qualified negative herds, must be vaccinated for pseudorabies with a G1 deleted vaccine within 45 days of arrival if imported into a county with a pseudorabies prevalence greater than 3 percent. This requirement must be stated on the import interstate certificate. Imported swine consigned directly to slaughter are exempt from vaccination requirements.  64.155(6)  Slaughter affidavits shall accompany all shipments of feeder swine or finished swine from concentration points moving direct to slaughter.  64.155(7)  Transportation certificate. This certificate involves shipments of swine from farm or approved premises moving direct to slaughter as detailed in Iowa Code chapter 172B. Veterinary inspection not required.  64.155(8)  Rescinded IAB 10/22/97, effective 10/1/97.21—64.156(166D)  Noninfected herds.    64.156(1)    Qualified pseudorabies negative herd—recertification.    a.  Recertification of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd and a qualified differential negative herd shall be by monthly testing, as detailed in Iowa Code section 166D.7(1)“a.”  b.  The status of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd will be revoked if:  (1)  A positive test is recognized and interpreted by a pseudorabies epidemiologist as infected.  (2)  Pseudorabies infection is diagnosed.  (3)  Recertification testing is not done on time.  (4)  Inadequate number of animals are tested.  (5)  Once a qualified pseudorabies negative herd is decertified, the herd must meet all requirements of Iowa Code section 166D.7, to recertify as a qualified pseudorabies negative herd.  64.156(2)    Iowa monitored feeder pig herd.    a.  Test requirements for a monitored feeder pig herd status include a negative herd test every 12 months of randomly selected breeding animals according to the following schedule:1-10 head Test all11-35 head Test 1036 or more Test 30 percent or 30, whichever is less.Effective July 1, 2000, all breeding herd locations in Stage II counties must have a monitored or better status or move by restricted movement.  b.  A monitored identification card will be sent by first-class mail to the herd owner shown on the test chart if test results qualify the herd as monitored. An expiration date which is 12 months from the date that the certifying tests were drawn will be printed on the card.It is the owner’s responsibility to retest the herd annually. The monitored status is voided on the date of expiration. A monitored herd status is revoked if:  (1)  A positive test is recognized and interpreted by a pseudorabies epidemiologist and interpreted as infected.  (2)  Pseudorabies infection is diagnosed.  (3)  Recertification test is not done on time.  (4)  Not enough tests, according to herd size and vaccination status, are submitted.  c.  Additions of swine to a monitored herd shall be from noninfected herds, according to Iowa Code section 166D.7.  d.  Feeder pigs sold for further feeding require a monitoring test conducted within the six months prior to movement if the feeder pigs have been maintained on the same site as the breeding herd.  e.  Monitored, or higher, status feeder pigs sold may regain, and maintain, monitored status by a negative test of all or a random sample of 30 head of each segregated group, whichever is less, within 30 days prior to resale.  f.  Nursery units located in Stage II counties and not in the vicinity of the breeding herd are required to maintain a monitored status on the nursery unit in order for the swine to be eligible to be relocated to a finishing premises. Feeder pigs sold from these nursery units must meet the requirements of a negative test of all or a random sample of 30 head of each segregated group, whichever is less, within 30 days prior to sale. An official random-sample test shall be required for each segregated group of swine on an individual premises every 12 months for the maintenance of this monitored status. These testing requirements apply to swine eligible for relocation movement. Testing requirements for this random sampling are:Test 10 head per building, minimum 14 head per site.Effective July 1, 2000, all nursery locations in Stage II counties must have a monitored or better status or move by restricted movement.  g.  Off-site finishing units located in the Stage II counties are required to maintain a monitored status on the finishing unit in order for the swine to be eligible to be sold to slaughter. An official random-sample test will be required for each segregated group of swine on an individual premises every 12 months for the maintenance of this monitored status. These testing requirements also apply to swine eligible for relocation movement. Testing requirements for this random sampling are:Test 10 head per building, minimum 14 head per site.Effective July 1, 2000, all finishing locations in Stage II counties must have a monitored or better status or move by restricted movement.  h.  Relocation, and sales to slaughter, require a 12-month monitoring test.  64.156(3)    Qualified differentiable negative herd—recertification.    a.  Recertification of a qualified differentiable negative herd will include monthly testing, as detailed in Iowa Code section 166D.7. A minimum of five breeding swine or 10 percent of the breeding herd, whichever is greater, must be tested each month.  b.  The status of a qualified differentiable negative herd will be revoked if:  (1)  A positive test is recognized and interpreted by a pseudorabies epidemiologist as infected.  (2)  Pseudorabies infection is diagnosed.  (3)  Recertification testing is not done on time.  (4)  Inadequate number of animals are tested.  (5)  Once a qualified differentiable negative herd is decertified, the herd must meet all requirements in Iowa Code section 166D.7 to recertify as a qualified differentiable negative herd.  64.156(4)    Maintaining qualified negative status (progeny).  Progeny from qualified negative (unvaccinated) or from qualified negative (vaccinated) herds moved to a facility not within the vicinity of the herd of origin and unexposed to lesser status swine may maintain qualified negative status by a monthly negative test of 10 percent or 60 head, whichever is less, of swine that have been on the premises for at least 30 days.  64.156(5)    Other qualified pseudorabies negative herds.  Any breeding herd in a Stage IV or V State/Area or an area outside the United States with a low incidence of pseudorabies equivalent to a Stage IV or V State/Area is recognized as a qualified pseudorabies negative herd.  64.156(6)    Fertility centers.  Breeding swine in a fertility center shall attain a “noninfected herd” status by an initial negative test of all breeding swine in the center. This status shall be maintained by a monthly negative test of a random sample of five head or 10 percent, whichever is greater, of the swine at the center. All additions of swine to the fertility center must originate from a “noninfected” herd, must be placed in isolation for 30 days or more, and must test negative for pseudorabies 20 days or more after being isolated.  a.  Semen and germplasm must be identified to the fertility center of origin.  b.  Imported semen or germplasm must originate from a fertility center, or “noninfected” herd, with requirements at least equivalent to the above, and be identified to the fertility center.21—64.157(166D)  Herd cleanup plan for infected herds (eradication plan).    64.157(1)  The herd cleanup plan shall be a written plan approved and on file with the department.  64.157(2)  The herd cleanup plan shall contain:  a.  Owner’s name, location and herd number.  b.  Type of herd plan selected, e.g., offspring segregation, test and removal, depopulation.  c.  Description of the plan, which shall include the following requirements:  (1)  The breeding herd shall be maintained on an approved vaccination program, at least four times per year;  (2)  The progeny shall be weaned and segregated by five weeks of age or less, and progeny group isolation shall be maintained according to the terms of the herd plan;  (3)  The herd must be visited on a regular basis (at least quarterly) by the herd veterinarian to monitor progress of the herd cleanup plan. This will include monthly testing if applicable, overseeing management procedures which may include all-in, all-out swine movement, ventilation, sanitation, disinfection, and vaccine handling;  (4)  Vaccine shall be administered to the progeny swine at least once, or more often if required by the herd plan;  (5)  Feeder pig movement or relocation from the premises of origin must be detailed in writing in the herd cleanup plan. Feeder pig movement or relocation from the premises of origin will only be allowed to approved premises and must be detailed in writing in the herd cleanup plan. Movement will not be allowed from the herd if the herd has experienced clinical symptoms of pseudorabies in the past 30 days. Effective April 19, 2000, all movements from infected premises shall be by restricted movement. “Movement” in this paragraph includes movement to a premises in the production system not in the vicinity of the current location, irrespective of whether there is a change of ownership;  (6)  Culled breeding swine must move by restricted movement directly to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point) or to an approved premises in compliance with Iowa Code section 166D.10 as amended by 2000 Iowa Acts, Senate File 2312, section 16, and as detailed in the herd cleanup plan. No swine moved from infected herds may be represented as breeding swine;  (7)  Herds identified as infected on or after August 1, 1999, with breeding swine, shall implement a test and removal herd cleanup plan which allows for the phased test and removal of bred animals for one farrowing cycle, followed by a whole herd test and removal plan. Effective August 1, 2000, a whole herd test and removal plan shall be implemented for all infected breeding herds. The herd plan shall include the following:
    1. All breeding swine, including boars, shall be tested within 14 days of the herd’s being classified as infected. Testing shall also include progeny, if applicable.
    2. All breeding swine must be identified by an approved ear tag, or other approved identification method, at the time of blood collection.
    3. Until August 1, 2000, all seropositive, unbred breeding swine must be removed from the herd by restricted movement, direct to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point), within 15 days after blood collection. All seropositive, bred swine must be removed from the herd by restricted movement, direct to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point), within 15 days of weaning. All replacement breeding stock must be vaccinated prior to addition into the herd and must be retested 60 days after entry into the herd. Effective August 1, 2000, all seropositive animals, bred or unbred, must be removed from the herd by restricted movement, direct to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point), within 15 days of the whole herd test. All known positive animals in the herd on August 1, 2000, must be removed from the herd by restricted movement, direct to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point), by August 15, 2000.
    4. A whole herd test shall be required within 30 days after the removal of the last known positive animal. Any additional seropositive animals must be removed from the herd by restricted movement, direct to slaughter, within 15 days of the collection date. Whole herd retests shall be required at 30-day intervals, with removal of positive animals within 15 days of the test, until it has been determined that the herd is noninfected.
    5. Seropositive swine must be removed from the herd, by restricted movement, direct to a buying station or to a slaughtering establishment.
    All swine movement from infected herds must be by restricted movement directly to slaughter or to an approved premises as detailed in the herd cleanup plan.When a herd is designated a noninfected herd, or has been depopulated, by procedures detailed in Iowa Code section 166D.9, the plan is completed;
      (8)  Beginning October 1, 1999, a herd cleanup plan shall be implemented for all infected finishing herds which shall include the following:
    1. A description of the premises, including the location, capacity, physical layout, owner’s name, and herd number.
    2. Vaccination requirements:
    3. Every animal, unless such animal is within three weeks of anticipated slaughter, must be vaccinated with an approved pseudorabies vaccine within seven days of notification by a regulatory official.
    4. New animals introduced into the infected premises are to be vaccinated with an approved pseudorabies vaccine according to the timetable outlined in the herd plan.
    5. If, through subsequent testing, additional buildings on the site are determined to be infected, all swine on the site shall be managed by all-in, all-out production.
    6. Testing requirements:
    7. A minimum of 14 swine, selected randomly, per building, shall be tested immediately.
    8. Swine shall be retested, at a minimum of 14 animals, selected randomly, per building, every 45 days, if necessary, until the premises are determined to be noninfected.
    9. Description, restrictions, and requirements of pig flow through the facilities.
    10. All movements from infected finishing sites shall be by restricted movement and only to slaughter.
      d.  Specific movement limitations which may include approved destination locations, “restricted movement to slaughter,” or other appropriate animal movement control measures.  e.  Signatures of the herd owner, the owner’s veterinarian, and the epidemiologist or the epidemiologist’s representative.
      64.157(3)  Rescinded IAB 10/22/97, effective 10/1/97.  64.157(4)  Rescinded IAB 10/22/97, effective 10/1/97.  64.157(5)  If this herd cleanup plan is not followed, is discontinued, or is not progressing in a satisfactory manner as determined by the department, the herd is a quarantined herd and is subject to “restricted movement to slaughter,” according to 2000 Iowa Acts, Senate File 2312, section 17, until a new and approved cleanup plan is in place and showing progress according to a designated epidemiologist.  64.157(6)  Rescinded IAB 10/22/97, effective 10/1/97.  64.157(7)  A deviation from a herd cleanup plan may be used in exigent circumstances if the deviation has the approval, in writing, of the epidemiologist and the state veterinarian.
    21—64.158(166D)  Feeder pig cooperator plan for infected herds.    64.158(1)  A feeder pig cooperator plan shall be a written plan approved and on file with the department.  64.158(2)  Feeder Pig Cooperator Plan Agreement—revised effective April 1, 1995.Feeder Pig Cooperator Plan Agreement—RevisedDate:Herd I.D. Number:Owner’s Name:Address:Telephone Number:The Feeder Pig Cooperator Plan Agreement shall include the following:
    1. The herd has not experienced clinical signs of pseudorabies within the previous 30 days.
    2. Maintain the breeding herd on an approved vaccination program, at least four times per year.
    3. Wean and segregate progeny by five weeks of age or less and maintain progeny group isolation until moved as feeder pigs.
    4. The herd must be visited at least quarterly by the herd veterinarian to monitor progress of herd cleanup plan; this shall include quarterly testing, if applicable, overseeing management procedures including all-in, all-out swine movement, ventilation, animal waste handling, sanitation, disinfection and vaccine handling.
    5. Feeder pigs may be marketed or moved intrastate as cooperator pigs by restricted movement to approved premises detailed in the herd cleanup plan provided that all requirements of this plan are followed.
    6. All feeder pigs must be vaccinated prior to sale. Vaccine shall be administered according to individual’s herd plan.
    7. All feeder pigs must be identified prior to sale with an official pink feeder pig ear tag, or a tattoo, approved by the department, beginning with the letters PR. All movement of feeder pigs from the herd shall be by restricted movement and only be allowed to approved premises detailed in the herd cleanup plan. All feeder pigs are quarantined to farm of destination until sold to slaughter. Movement to slaughter must be by restricted movement.
    8. Breeding swine shall move directly to slaughter, or an approved premises in compliance with Iowa Code section 166D.10 as amended by 2000 Iowa Acts, Senate File 2312, section 16, and as detailed in the herd cleanup plan, and by restricted movement. No swine from infected herds may be represented as breeding swine.
    9. The producer shall maintain a record of all test charts, all sales transactions by way of health certificates or restricted movement permits, and vaccine purchases for at least two years. These records shall be available to department officials upon request.
    10. When this herd is determined, through procedures as detailed in Iowa Code section 166D.9, to become a noninfected herd or is depopulated, the plan is completed.
    11. I agree, if this plan is not followed, is discontinued, or is not progressing in a satisfactory manner as determined by the department, the herd is a quarantined herd and subject to restricted movement, direct to slaughter or to an approved premises.
    I am currently enrolled in an approved herd cleanup plan. I further agree to comply with all the requirements contained in this Feeder Pig Cooperator Plan Agreement.Herd Owner: Date:Herd Veterinarian: Date:
    21—64.159(166D)  Herds of unknown status.  Feeder pigs from herds of unknown status may not move after September 30, 1993; however, these herds may test to determine status and feeder pigs may be moved according to 64.156(1), 64.156(2), 64.156(3), 64.157(3), or 64.158(2).The owner must provide test data, prior to movement, proving that these requirements have been met.21—64.160(166D)  Approved premises.  The purpose of an approved premises is to maintain feeder swine and feeder pigs under quarantine with movement either direct to slaughter or to another approved premises. Effective June 1, 2000, all swine moved or relocated from an infected herd on an approved herd cleanup plan may only move by restricted movement to an approved premises for further feeding or to slaughter (slaughtering plant or fixed concentration point).  64.160(1)  The following are requirements establishing, renewing, or revoking an approved premises permit:  a.  A permit application, as part of the herd cleanup plan, must indicate the name of the premises operator and address of the premises.  b.  To be valid, an approved premises must be detailed as part of a herd cleanup plan and approved by a department or inspection service official certifying that the facility meets the following guidelines:  (1)  Must be a dry lot facility located in an area of confirmed cases of pseudorabies.  (2)  Shall not be in the vicinity of a breeding herd. Effective June 1, 2000, an approved premises shall not be located in a county designated as in Stage III of the national pseudorabies eradication program, nor shall it be located in a county which has achieved 0 percent prevalence of pseudorabies infection among all herds in the county as of March 1, 2000, or later. Effective August 1, 2000, an approved premises shall not be located within one and one-half miles of a noninfected herd or three miles of a qualified negative herd.  (3)  Shall be built such that it can be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.  (4)  The lay of the land or the facilities shall not be conducive to animal waste draining onto adjacent property.  (5)  Only feeder swine and cull swine may be moved onto this premises. Boars and sows are to be maintained separate and apart.  (6)  Swine on the premises must be maintained in isolation from other livestock.  c.  The permittee must provide to the department or inspection service, during normal business hours, access to the approved premises and to all required records. Records of swine transfers must be kept for at least one year. The records shall include information about purchases and sales, names of buyers and sellers, the dates of transactions, and the number of swine involved with each transaction.  d.  Swine must be vaccinated for pseudorabies according to the herd cleanup plan. Vaccination records must be available for inspection during normal business hours.  e.  Dead swine must be disposed of in accordance with Iowa Code chapter 167. The dead swine must be held so as to prevent animals, including wild animals and livestock, from reaching the dead swine.  f.  Swine must be moved direct to slaughter or to another approved premises by restricted movement and as detailed in the herd cleanup plan.  g.  An approved premises permit may be revoked by following quarantine release methods as detailed in Iowa Code section 166D.9, or failure to comply with departmental operation rules, or if swine have been removed from the premises for a period of 12 or more months.  h.  Renewal of an approved premises will not be permitted when:  (1)  The approved premises is not compliant with the requirements of this rule.  (2)  Federal law prohibits approved premises.  (3)  The approved premises no longer is part of an approved herd cleanup plan, or the county where the approved premises is located no longer allows approved premises or the site of the approved premises no longer complies with requirements.  i.  Revocation of an approved premises will result in the issuance of a quarantine by the department effective until quarantine release methods have been followed as detailed in Iowa Code section 166D.9, or the approved premises has been depopulated by restricted movement to slaughter or to another approved premises as detailed in the herd cleanup plan.  64.160(2)  An approved premises will be considered permitted as long as the approved premises is compliant with all regulations and is part of an approved herd cleanup plan.21—64.161(166D)  Sales to approved premises.  After June 1, 2000, all feeder pigs and cull swine except those from “noninfected herds” must be moved directly to an approved premises by restricted movement for further feeding; however, these pigs may continue to move as cooperator pigs if a “Feeder Pig Cooperator Plan Agreement—Revised” is approved by the department and movement is permitted by the department.21—64.162(166D)  Certification of veterinarians to initiate approved herd cleanup plans and approved feeder pig cooperator plan agreements and fee basis.    64.162(1)    Requirements for certification.  To be certified, the veterinarian shall meet both of the following requirements:  a.  Be an accredited veterinarian.  b.  Attend and complete continuing education sessions as determined by the Iowa pseudorabies advisory committee and the department.  64.162(2)    Responsibilities.  A certified veterinarian is authorized to do the following:  a.  Complete and submit herd plan and herd agreement forms (supplied by the department) within ten days of completion for approval by the department.  b.  Review and update herd plans and herd agreements and report to the department any changes made.  64.162(3)    Revocation of certification.  Failure to comply with the above requirements of this rule will result in revocation of certification.  64.162(4)    Remuneration.  Compensation will be made to the veterinarian or veterinarians certified to initiate herd plans and herd agreements. Payment will be made from pseudorabies program funds, if available and authorized for these purposes. Fees for payment shall be approved by the advisory committee and established by the department by order. Payment will be made for the following:  a.  Initial herd cleanup plan with or without an accompanying feeder pig cooperator agreement. Payment will be made upon submission of the completed form and department approval of the plan.  b.  Review of herd cleanup plan. Payment will be made upon submission of the completed form and department approval of the plan review.  c.  Upon completion of the herd cleanup plan and release of the infected status, the veterinarian will receive a payment.  d.  All other herd consultation or time devoted to herd plan implementation shall be at owner’s expense.  64.162(5)    Fee basis.  The following fees are allocated to the testing veterinarian when approved by the department, provided funding is available:  a.  Herd stop fee per stop not to exceed four stops per year.  b.  Bleeding fee per animal, not to exceed 100 tests per herd, per year.  c.  Differentiable vaccine reimbursement per dose, when dispensed during the first 24 months from the date of initial program area designation. Doses of pseudorabies differentiable vaccine are dispensed to infected herds on approved cleanup plans, based upon date of herd plan approval, according to the number of breeding swine.  d.  Fees for additional herd stops and tests may be allocated by approval from the department.21—64.163(166D)  Nondifferentiable pseudorabies vaccine disapproved.  Transferred and amended, see 21—64.152(163,166D), IAB 8/19/92.These rules are intended to implement Iowa Code chapters 163 and 166D.21—64.164    Reserved.21—64.165    Reserved.21—64.166    Reserved.21—64.167    Reserved.21—64.168    Reserved.21—64.169    Reserved.PARATUBERCULOSIS (JOHNE’S) DISEASE21—64.170(165A)  Definitions.  Definitions used in rules 21—64.170(165A) through 21—64.178(165A) are as follows:
    "Accredited veterinarian" means a veterinarian approved by the deputy administrator of veterinary services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the state veterinarian in accordance with Part 161 of Title 9, Chapter 1 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2000, to perform functions required by cooperative state-federal animal disease control and eradication programs.
    "Approved laboratory" means an American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) accredited laboratory or the National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, Iowa. An approved laboratory must have successfully passed the Johne’s diagnostic proficiency test in the previous year.
    "Certificate" means an official document that is issued at the point of origin by a state veterinarian, federal animal health official, or accredited veterinarian and contains information on the individual identification of each animal being moved, the number of animals, the purpose of the movement, the points of origin and destination, the consignor, the consignee, and any other information required by the state veterinarian.
    "Designated epidemiologist" means a veterinarian who has demonstrated the knowledge and ability to perform the functions required under these rules and who has been selected by the state veterinarian.
    "Individual herd plan" means a written herd management plan that is designed by the herd owner, the owner’s veterinarian, if requested, and a designated epidemiologist to identify and control Johne’s disease in an affected herd. The individual herd plan may include optional testing.
    "Johne’s disease-affected animal" means an animal which has reacted positively to an organism-based detection test conducted by an approved laboratory.
    "Permit" means an official document for movement of affected or exposed animals that is issued by the state veterinarian, USDA Area Veterinarian-in-Charge, or accredited veterinarian.
    "State" means any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or Guam.
    Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.171(165A)  Supervision of the Johne’s disease program.  The state veterinarian’s office will provide supervision for the Johne’s disease program.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.172(165A)  Official Johne’s disease tests.  Organism-based detection tests will be considered as official Johne’s disease tests. These tests include, but are not limited to, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests and bacteriological culture.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.173(165A)  Vaccination allowed.  Vaccination against Johne’s disease is allowed with the permission of the state veterinarian. The herd owner requesting vaccination of the herd must sign and follow a Johne’s disease herd control plan consisting of best management practices designed to prevent the introduction of and control the spread of Johne’s disease. A risk assessment may be included as part of the herd control plan. The herd owner shall submit animal vaccination reports to the department on forms provided by the department.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.174(165A)  Herd plan.  The herd owner, the owner’s veterinarian, if requested, and the designated epidemiologist may develop a plan for preventing the introduction of and controlling the spread of Johne’s disease in each affected herd.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.175(165A)  Identification and disposal requirements.  Affected animals must remain on the premises where they are found until they are permanently identified by an accredited veterinarian applying a C-punch in the right ear of the animal. Affected animals may be moved only for the purpose of consigning the animal to slaughter.21—64.176(165A)  Segregation, cleaning, and disinfecting.  Positive animals, consigned to slaughter through a state-federal approved auction market, must be maintained separate and apart from noninfected animals. Positive animals must be the last class of animal sold. Cleaning and disinfection of the alleyways, pen(s) and sale ring used to house positive animals must be accomplished prior to the next scheduled sale. Affected animals entering slaughter marketing channels must be moved directly to the slaughter facility or the slaughter market concentration point. Transportation vehicles used to haul affected animals shall be cleaned and disinfected after such use and before transporting any additional animals.21—64.177(165A)  Intrastate movement requirements.    64.177(1)  Animals that are positive to an official Johne’s disease test may be moved from the farm of origin for slaughter only if the animals are moved directly to a recognized slaughtering establishment and accompanied by an owner-shipper statement that identifies the animals as positive to an official Johne’s disease test and the statement is delivered to the consignee. Positive animals shall be identified prior to movement by application of a C-punch in the right ear of the animal.  64.177(2)  Animals that are positive to an official Johne’s disease test may be moved within Iowa for slaughter and consigned to a state-federal approved slaughter market if the animals are accompanied by an owner-shipper statement that identifies the animals as positive to an official Johne’s disease test and the statement is delivered to the consignee. Positive animals shall be identified prior to movement by application of a C-punch in the right ear of the animal.  64.177(3)  Animals that are positive to an official Johne’s disease test may be moved within Iowa for purposes other than slaughter only by permit from the state veterinarian.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.178(165A)  Import requirements.    64.178(1)  Animals that are positive to an official Johne’s disease test may be imported into Iowa for slaughter if the animals are moved directly to a recognized slaughtering establishment and accompanied by an owner-shipper statement that identifies the animals as positive to an official Johne’s disease test and the statement is delivered to the consignee. All animals must be officially identified.  64.178(2)  Animals that are positive to an official Johne’s disease test may be imported into Iowa for slaughter and consigned to a state-federal approved slaughter market if the animals are accompanied by an owner-shipper statement that identifies the animals as positive to an official Johne’s disease test and the statement is delivered to the consignee. Positive animals shall be identified at the market, prior to sale, by application of a C-punch in the right ear of the animal.  64.178(3)  Animals that are positive to an official Johne’s disease test may be imported into Iowa for purposes other than slaughter only by permit from the state veterinarian.Related ARC(s): 0230C21—64.179    Reserved.21—64.180    Reserved.21—64.181    Reserved.21—64.182    Reserved.21—64.183    Reserved.21—64.184    Reserved.These rules are intended to implement Iowa Code Supplement chapter 165A.LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA (LPAI)21—64.185(163)  Definitions.  Terms used in these rules are defined as follows:
    "Affected poultry flock" means a poultry flock from which any animal has been diagnosed as infected with LPAI and which is not in compliance with the provisions of the control program for LPAI as described in this chapter.
    "Approved laboratory" means the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, or other American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) accredited laboratory, including the National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, Iowa.
    "Designated epidemiologist" means a state veterinarian who has demonstrated the knowledge and ability to perform the functions required under these rules and who has been selected by the state veterinarian.
    "House/housing facilities" means the individual barn that houses the poultry.
    "Individual flock plan" means a written flock management and testing plan that is designed by the flock owner, the owner’s veterinarian, if requested, and a designated epidemiologist to identify and eradicate LPAI from an affected or exposed flock and to prevent the spread of the disease to an adjacent flock.
    "Low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI)" means an infectious, contagious disease of poultry caused by Type A influenza virus. For the purposes of these rules, LPAI shall include only subtypes identified as H5 or H7.
    "LPAI affected" means a designation applied to poultry diagnosed as infected with LPAI based on laboratory results, clinical signs, or epidemiologic investigation.
    "LPAI suspect" means a designation applied to poultry for which laboratory evidence or clinical signs suggest a diagnosis of LPAI but for which laboratory results are inconclusive.
    "Monitored LPAI poultry flock" means a flock of poultry that is in compliance with the surveillance and testing procedures set forth in these rules.
    "Official avian influenza test" means an approved test conducted at a laboratory approved to diagnose avian influenza.
    "Poultry" means commercial egg-laying and meat-producing chickens and commercial turkeys. “Poultry” also means breeder flocks.
    "Poultry flock" means a group of poultry, generally of the same age, that are hatched, housed, managed, and sold together as one unit.
    "Quarantine" means an imposed restriction prohibiting movement of poultry to any location without specific written permits.
    "Slaughter/disposal" means the removal or depopulation of the poultry flock.
    21—64.186(163)  Supervision of the low pathogenic avian influenza program.  The state veterinarian’s office shall provide oversight and supervision of the LPAI program in Iowa.21—64.187(163)  Surveillance procedures.  Surveillance procedures shall only apply to commercial poultry flocks of 10,000 or more layers, commercial chicken broiler operations with 10,000 or more broilers, and commercial turkey operations with 1,000 or more turkeys. Breeders that participate in, and qualify under, the USDA, APHIS, NPIP U.S. Avian Influenza Clean Program meet or exceed the surveillance provisions of this plan and are exempt from further certification under this rule. For poultry flocks, surveillance procedures shall include the following:  64.187(1)    Turkeys and turkey poults.    a.    Preslaughter/movement testing.  A minimum of six blood samples per flock may be collected and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing within 21 days prior to depopulation or movement; or  b.    Slaughter/disposal testing.  Six blood samples per flock shall be collected at slaughter/disposal and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing.  c.    Sick flock testing.  Twenty blood samples shall be collected between 10 days and 21 days after the onset of respiratory disease and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing, and 20 pharyngeal swabs shall be collected at onset of respiratory disease and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing.  d.    Routine serologic testing.  A test for LPAI should be included.  64.187(2)    Laying chickens and pre-lay pullets.    a.    Preslaughter/disposal/movement testing.  Eleven blood samples shall be collected and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing within 30 days prior to depopulation or disposal of spent hens or movement of pre-lay pullets to another farm.  b.    Sick flock testing.  Twenty blood samples shall be collected between 10 days and 21 days after the onset of respiratory disease and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing, and 20 pharyngeal swabs shall be collected at onset of respiratory disease and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing.  c.    Routine serologic testing.  A test for LPAI of 11 birds per barn during a 12-month period shall be collected and forwarded.  64.187(3)    Broiler chickens.    a.    Preslaughter testing.  Eleven blood samples may be collected and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing within 21 days prior to depopulation; or  b.    Slaughter/disposal testing.  Eleven blood samples shall be collected at slaughter/disposal and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing.  c.    Sick flock testing.  Twenty blood samples shall be collected between 10 days and 21 days after the onset of respiratory disease and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing, and 20 pharyngeal swabs shall be collected at onset of respiratory disease and forwarded to an approved laboratory for LPAI testing.  d.    Routine serologic testing.  A test for LPAI should be included.Related ARC(s): 1802C21—64.188(163)  Official LPAI tests.  Official tests for LPAI are:
    1. Agar Gel Precipitin (AGP);
    2. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA);
    3. Any other tests performed by an approved laboratory to confirm a diagnosis of LPAI.Tests positive to screening for avian influenza through AGP, ELISA, and any other tests performed by an approved laboratory to confirm a diagnosis of LPAI must be forwarded to National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, for subtype testing.
    4. Influenza type A antigen detection tests approved by the state veterinarian. All influenza type A antigen detection tests performed shall be prior-approved by the state veterinarian, and all positive tests results shall be reported immediately to the state veterinarian. A monthly report of all test results shall be reported to the state veterinarian.
    21—64.189(163)  Investigation of LPAI affected poultry identified through surveillance.  All poultry diagnosed at an approved laboratory as infected with LPAI must be traced back to the flock or farm of origin.All flocks having contact with affected or exposed poultry as determined by the designated epidemiologist must be investigated epidemiologically. All farms of origin and flocks having contact with affected or exposed poultry must be quarantined, pending the results of the epidemiological investigation.21—64.190(163)  Duration of quarantine.  Quarantines imposed in accordance with these rules shall be in effect for a minimum of three months after the last detection of active avian influenza virus on the premises. Active avian influenza virus on the premises will be determined through the use of sentinel poultry or virus isolation.21—64.191(163)  Flock plan.    64.191(1)  The flock owner, the owner’s veterinarian, if requested, and the epidemiologist shall develop a plan for eradicating LPAI in each affected flock. The plan must be designed to reduce and then eliminate LPAI from the flock, to prevent spread of the disease to other flocks, and to prevent reintroduction of LPAI after the flock becomes disease-free. The flock plan must be developed and signed within 15 days after the determination that the flock is affected.  64.191(2)  The flock plan will include, but is not limited to, the following areas:  a.  Movement of vehicles, equipment, and people on and off the premises.  b.  Cleaning and disinfection of vehicles entering and leaving the premises.  c.  Proper elimination of daily mortality through composting on premises, incineration on premises, or other approved method.  d.  Biosecurity procedures for people entering or leaving the facility.  e.  Controlled marketing.  (1)  No poultry may be removed from the premises for a minimum of 21 days after the last detection of active avian influenza virus on the premises. Immune flocks that have recovered from avian influenza infection may remain on the premises for the remainder of their scheduled life span.  (2)  After 21 days, poultry marketing will only be allowed for delivery to slaughter establishments at the close of business for the week.  (3)  Routes used to transport poultry to slaughter must avoid other poultry operations.  (4)  Trucks used to transport poultry from an infected premises must be cleaned and disinfected and may not enter another poultry facility for at least 24 hours.  (5)  Eggs which are washed, sanitized, and packed in new materials may be moved into normal marketing channels, but trucks hauling these eggs must not visit another premises between the production site and the market. Egg handling materials must be destroyed at the plant or cleaned, sanitized, and returned to the premises of origin without contacting materials going to other premises. Disposable egg flats or sanitized, plastic flats must be used to transport eggs.  (6)  Eggs that are sold as “nest run” and are not washed and sanitized must be moved directly to only an “off-line” breaking operation for pasteurization and used for breaking only. The egg handling materials must be handled as described in (5) above.  (7)  Liquid eggs from layer flocks may continue to move from breaking operations directly to pasteurization plants provided that the transport vehicles are cleaned and disinfected before entering and leaving the premises.  f.  Vaccination. Avian influenza vaccine will be considered for use only if allowed by the state veterinarian and USDA APHIS.  (1)  Killed H5 or H7 vaccine may be used to immunize all noninfected poultry remaining on the premises. Laying-flock replacement poultry should be vaccinated at least two weeks before entering the laying operation.  (2)  Twenty sentinel (nonvaccinated) poultry will be kept in each vaccinated flock, and all 20 will be tested for avian influenza every 30 days.  (3)  Avian influenza virus will be considered to be no longer active when all sentinel poultry are serologically negative on two consecutive tests conducted at least 14 days apart and when cloacal swabs from each of the 20 sentinel poultry are negative by virus isolation testing.  (4)  Positive sentinel poultry must be euthanized and replaced by negative poultry after 14 days.  (5)  Slaughter withdrawal times must be followed in the marketing of poultry.  g.  Housing facilities and manure. Before a new flock is placed in an infected house, manure must be removed and the housing facilities must be cleaned and disinfected. Manure shall not be removed from the premises for a minimum of 30 days after the last active detection of avian influenza virus in a house. Manure from infected housing facilities must be carried in covered conveyances, and transportation routes must avoid other poultry operations. Manure handling and disposal will be at the direction of the state veterinarian.  h.  Wild bird, insect, and rodent control. Wild bird, insect, and rodent control programs must be implemented on the premises before a facility is repopulated with poultry. Rodenticide must be set out before feed or birds are removed from the premises.  64.191(3)  The plan must address flock management and be in compliance with all provisions of these rules. The plan must be formalized as a memorandum of agreement between the owner and program officials, must be approved by the state veterinarian, and must include plans to obtain a disease-free status.21—64.192(163)  Cleaning and disinfecting.  The housing facilities must be cleaned and disinfected under state supervision within 15 days after affected poultry and manure have been removed.21—64.193    Reserved.21—64.194    Reserved.21—64.195    Reserved.21—64.196    Reserved.21—64.197    Reserved.21—64.198    Reserved.21—64.199    Reserved.These rules are intended to implement Iowa Code chapter 163.SCRAPIE DISEASE21—64.200(163)  Definitions.  Definitions used in rules 21—64.200(163) through 21—64.211(163) are as follows:
    "Accredited veterinarian" means a veterinarian approved by the administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the state veterinarian in accordance with Part 161 of Title 9, Chapter 1 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), to perform functions required by cooperative state-federal animal disease control and eradication programs.
    "Administrator" means the administrator of APHIS or any employee of USDA to whom the administrator has delegated authority to act on behalf of the administrator.
    "Animal" means any sheep or goat.
    "APHIS representative" means an individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in animal health activities who is authorized by the administrator to perform the functions and duties involved.
    "Approved laboratory" means a diagnostic laboratory approved by APHIS to conduct tests for scrapie or genotypes on one or more tissues.
    "Area veterinarian-in-charge" "AVIC" means the veterinary official of APHIS assigned by APHIS to supervise and perform the official animal health work of APHIS in Iowa.
    "Breed associations and registries" means the organizations that maintain the permanent records of ancestry or pedigrees of animals (including each animal’s sire and dam), individual identification of animals, and ownership of animals.
    "Certificate of Veterinary Inspection" "CVI" means an official document approved by the department and issued by a licensed accredited veterinarian at the point of origin of movement of animals.
    "Commingle" means to group animals together in a manner that allows them to have physical contact with each other, including contact through a fence, but not limited contact. Commingling includes sharing the same section in a transportation unit where physical contact can occur.
    "Designated scrapie epidemiologist" "DSE" means a state or federal veterinarian designated by the department and APHIS to make decisions about the use and interpretation of diagnostic tests and field investigation data and the management of flocks and animals of epidemiological significance to the scrapie program.
    "Directly to slaughter" means movement from a farm to a place of business where animals are processed into meat, excluding movement through an auction market or livestock dealer’s place of business.
    "Exposed animal" means any animal that has had contact with a scrapie-positive animal or had contact with a premises where a scrapie-positive animal has resided and for which a flock plan has not yet been completed. Exposed animals shall be evaluated by a state or federal veterinarian in concurrence with the DSE and state veterinarian and may be redesignated into a risk category according to genetic resistance and exposure and may be restricted or have restrictions removed in accordance with current USDA regulations.
    "Exposed flock" means any flock in which:
    1. A scrapie-positive animal was born or gave birth; or
    2. A high-risk or suspect female animal currently resides; or
    3. A high-risk or suspect animal once resided that gave birth or aborted in the flock and from which tissues were not submitted for official scrapie testing.
    "Flock" means a group of sheep or goats, or a mixture of both species, residing on the same premises or under common ownership or supervision on two or more premises with animal interchange between the premises. Changes in ownership of part or all of a flock do not change the identity of the flock or the regulatory requirements applicable to the flock.
    "Flock identification number" "flock ID number" means the unique alphanumeric premises identification number that appears on the official identification issued to a flock, that conforms with the standards for an epidemiologically distinct premises, as outlined in 9 CFR 79.1, and that is assigned by USDA and approved by the department.
    "Flock of origin" means the flock of birth for male animals and, for female animals, means the flock in which the animal most recently resided in which it either was born, gave birth, or resided during lambing or kidding.
    "Flock plan" means a written flock management agreement signed by the owner of a flock, the accredited veterinarian, if one is employed by the owner, and a department or APHIS representative in which each participant agrees to undertake actions specified in the flock plan to control the spread of scrapie from, and eradicate scrapie in, an infected flock or source flock or to reduce the risk of the occurrence of scrapie in a flock that contains a high-risk or exposed animal. As part of a flock plan, the flock owner must provide the facilities and personnel needed to carry out the requirements of the flock plan. The flock plan must include the requirements in 9 CFR 54.8.
    "Genetic susceptibility" means the animal’s likelihood, based upon the genotype of the animal, of developing scrapie following exposure to scrapie.
    "High-risk animal" means:
    1. Any exposed female animal designated as genetically susceptible under current USDA guidelines;
    2. The female offspring of a scrapie-positive female animal; or
    3. Any other exposed female animal determined by the DSE to be a potential risk.
    "Infected flock" means any flock in which the DSE has determined that a scrapie-positive female animal has resided, unless an epidemiological investigation conducted by the DSE shows that the animal did not give birth or abort in the flock.
    "Interstate commerce" means trade, traffic, transportation, or other commerce between a place in a state and any place outside that state, or between points within a state but through any place outside that state.
    "Limited contact" means incidental contact between animals away from the flock’s premises, such as at fairs, shows, exhibitions, markets, and sales; between ewes being inseminated, flushed, or implanted; or between rams at ram test or collection stations. Embryo transfer and artificial insemination equipment and surgical tools must be sterilized after each use in order for the contact to be considered limited contact. Limited contact does not include any contact with a female animal during or up to 30 days after she gave birth or aborted or when there is any visible vaginal discharge other than that associated with estrus. Limited contact does not include any activity in which uninhibited contact occurs, such as sharing an enclosure, sharing a section of a transport vehicle, or residing in other flocks for breeding or other purposes, except as allowed by scrapie flock certification program standards.
    "Live-animal screening test" means any test used for the diagnosis of scrapie in a live animal, approved by APHIS, and conducted in a laboratory approved by APHIS.
    "Noncompliant flock" means:
    1. Any source or infected flock whose owner declines to enter into a flock plan or postexposure management and monitoring plan (PEMMP) agreement within 60 days of the flock’s being designated as a source or infected flock;
    2. Any exposed flock whose owner fails to make animals available for testing within 60 days of notification, or as mutually agreed upon by the department and the owner, or whose owner fails to submit required postmortem samples;
    3. Any flock whose owner or manager has misrepresented, or who employs a person who has misrepresented, the scrapie status of an animal or has misrepresented any other information on a certificate, permit, owner statement, or other official document within the last five years;
    4. Any flock whose owner or manager has moved, or who employs a person who has moved, an animal in violation of this chapter within the last five years; or
    5. Any flock which does not meet the requirements of a flock plan or PEMMP.
    "Official genotype test" means any test used to determine the genotype of a live or dead animal and conducted at an approved laboratory provided that the animal is officially identified and the samples used for the test are collected and shipped to the laboratory by either an accredited veterinarian or a department or APHIS representative.
    "Official identification" "official ID" means identification approved by the department and APHIS for use in the scrapie eradication program in the state of Iowa. For sheep, official identification consists of (1) approved ear tags which include the flock ID number combined with an individual animal number; (2) approved unique, alphanumeric serial-numbered ear tags; or (3) ear tags approved for use with the scrapie flock certification program. For goats, official identification consists of any method of identification approved by the USDA, as outlined in 9 CFR 79.2.
    "Official test" means any test used for the diagnosis of scrapie in a live or dead animal, approved by APHIS for that use, and conducted at an approved laboratory.
    "Owner" means a person, partnership, company, corporation, or any other legal entity which has legal or rightful title to animals.
    "Owner/seller statement form" means a written document to be completed by the owner or seller of animals that require official identification and includes the owner’s/seller’s name, address, and telephone number; date of transaction; the flock identification number; the number of animals involved; a statement indicating that the animals that require official identification have been officially identified and that the owner/seller will maintain records as to the origin of the individual animals for five years; and a signed owner statement.
    "Owner statement" means a statement signed by the owner certifying that the sexually intact animals are not scrapie-positive, suspect, high-risk, or exposed and that they did not originate from an infected, source, exposed, or noncompliant flock.
    "Permit" means an official document that has been issued by an APHIS or department representative or an authorized accredited veterinarian and allows the interstate movement of animals under quarantine. A seal may be required by the state veterinarian or AVIC.
    "Postexposure management and monitoring plan" "PEMMP" means a written agreement signed by the owner of a flock, an accredited veterinarian, if one is employed by the owner, and a department or APHIS representative in which each participant agrees to undertake actions specified in the agreement to reduce the risk of the occurrence of scrapie and to monitor for the occurrence of scrapie in the flock for at least five years after the last high-risk or scrapie-positive animal is removed from the flock or after the last exposure of the flock to a scrapie-positive animal, unless the monitoring time is otherwise specified by a department or APHIS representative. As part of a postexposure management and monitoring plan, the flock owner must provide the facilities and personnel needed to carry out the requirements of the plan. The plan must include the requirements in 9 CFR 54.8.
    "Premises" means the ground, area, buildings, and equipment occupied by one or more flocks of animals.
    "Quarantine" means an imposed restriction prohibiting movement of animals to any location without specific written permits.
    "Scrapie" means a nonfebrile, transmissible, insidious degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system of sheep and goats.
    "Scrapie eradication program" "program" means the cooperative state-federal-industry program administered by APHIS and states to control and eradicate scrapie.
    "Scrapie flock certification program" "SFCP" means a voluntary state-federal-industry cooperative program established and maintained to reduce the occurrence and spread of scrapie, to identify flocks that have been free of evidence of scrapie over specified time periods, and to contribute to the eventual eradication of scrapie. This program was formerly known as the voluntary scrapie flock certification program.
    "Scrapie-positive animal" "positive animal" means an animal for which a diagnosis of scrapie has been made by an approved laboratory through one of the following methods:
    1. Histopathological examination of central nervous system (CNS) tissues from the animal for characteristic microscopic lesions of scrapie;
    2. The use of protease-resistant protein analysis methods, including but not limited to immunohistochemistry or western blotting, on CNS or peripheral tissue samples from a live or a dead animal for which a given method has been approved by the administrator for use on that tissue;
    3. Bioassay;
    4. Scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF) detected by electron microscopy; or
    5. Any other test method approved by the administrator in accordance with 9 CFR 54.10.
    "Source flock" means a flock in which a department or APHIS representative has determined that at least one animal was born that was diagnosed as a scrapie-positive animal at an age of 72 months or less.
    "State animal health official" means an individual employed by the department in animal health activities and authorized by the department to perform the functions involved.
    "Suspect animal" means:
    1. A sheep or goat that exhibits any of the following possible signs of scrapie and that has been examined by an accredited veterinarian or a department or APHIS representative. Possible signs of scrapie include: weight loss despite retention of appetite; behavioral abnormalities; pruritus (itching); wool pulling; biting at legs or side; lip smacking; motor abnormalities such as incoordination, high-stepping gait of forelimbs, bunny hop movement of rear legs, or swaying of back end; increased sensitivity to noise and sudden movement; tremor, star gazing, head pressing, recumbency, or other signs of neurological disease or chronic wasting;
    2. A sheep or goat that has tested positive for scrapie or for the protease-resistant protein associated with scrapie on a live-animal screening test, or any other official test, unless the animal is designated as a scrapie-positive animal; or
    3. A sheep or goat that has tested inconclusive or suggestive of scrapie on an official test for scrapie.
    "Trace" means all actions required to identify the flock of origin or flock of destination of an animal.
    "Unofficial test" means any test used for the diagnosis of scrapie or for the detection of the protease-resistant protein associated with scrapie in a live or dead animal but that either has not been approved by APHIS or was not conducted at an approved diagnostic laboratory.
    "Veterinary signature-stamped bill of sale" means a document allowed in Iowa in lieu of a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection for use when animals are sold through a licensed auction market and will remain in Iowa. The bill of sale shall contain the following statement: “I certify, as an accredited veterinarian, that these animals have been inspected by me and that they are not showing any signs of infectious, contagious, or communicable diseases (except where noted).” The signature of the veterinarian who inspected the animals at the sale must appear on the document.
    21—64.201(163)  Supervision of the scrapie eradication program.  The scrapie eradication program is a cooperative program between the department and APHIS and is supervised by full-time animal health veterinarians employed by the state or federal government.21—64.202(163)  Identification.  Animals required to be officially identified shall have official identification applied upon, or before, departure from the current flock of origin by the flock owner or the owner’s agent. An animal that already has identification recognized as official for Iowa does not need to have any additional official identification applied. If an animal was not identified prior to departing from its flock of birth or if its identification has been lost, then the animal must be identified upon, or before, departing from the current flock in which the animal resides and the flock of birth, or previous flock of origin, should be recorded, if known. No person shall apply a flock ID tag to an animal that has not resided in that flock. If a sexually intact animal that requires official identification is of uncertain origin or if the animal is identified with a blue metal “meat only” tag or a red or yellow tag denoting exposure or test status, then the animal may not be used for breeding and must be restricted until slaughter. Animals that require official identification and enter the state of Iowa from other states must be identified with an identification that complies with 9 CFR 79.2. For sheep originating from out of state, ear tags that comply with 9 CFR 79.2 will be considered official identification in Iowa. For goats, either ear tags or tattoos that comply with 9 CFR 79.2 will be considered official identification in Iowa.  64.202(1)    Sheep—official identification required.  Sheep required to be officially identified include:  a.  All sexually intact sheep, unless specifically excluded in these rules;  b.  All sexually intact sheep for exhibition;  c.  All sheep over 18 months of age;  d.  All sheep residing in noncompliant flocks;  e.  All exposed, suspect, positive and high-risk sheep; and  f.  Sexually intact sheep of any age imported into Iowa, except as noted in 64.202(2).  64.202(2)    Sheep—official identification not required.  Sheep that do not require official identification include:  a.  Sheep under 18 months of age originating from outside the state of Iowa moving into an approved terminal feedlot, and any sheep under 18 months of age moving directly to slaughter;  b.  Wether sheep for exhibition, unless over 18 months of age; and  c.  Sheep moved for grazing or similar management reasons provided that the sheep are moved from a premises owned or leased by the owner of the sheep to another premises owned or leased by the owner of the sheep.  64.202(3)    Goats—official identification required.  Goats that require official identification include:  a.  Sexually intact goats that are registered, are used for exhibition, or have resided on the same premises with or been commingled with sheep, excluding limited contact;  b.  All goats residing in noncompliant flocks; and  c.  All exposed, suspect, positive and high-risk goats.  64.202(4)    Goats—official identification not required.  Goats that do not require official identification include:  a.  Goats under 18 months of age originating from outside the state of Iowa moving into an approved terminal feedlot, and any goats under 18 months of age moving directly to slaughter;  b.  Wether goats for exhibition;  c.  Goats raised and maintained apart from sheep and used exclusively for meat and fiber production;  d.  Pet goats raised and maintained apart from sheep and not registered or used for exhibition;  e.  Dairy goats raised and maintained apart from sheep and not registered or used for exhibition; and  f.  Goats moved for grazing or similar management reasons provided that the goats are moved from a premises owned or leased by the owner of the goats to another premises owned or leased by the owner of the goats.Note: Official identification requirements for goats will become identical to those for sheep 90 days following the disclosure of a case of scrapie in Iowa goats that cannot be attributed to exposure to sheep.21—64.203(163)  Restrictions on the removal of official identification.  No person may remove or tamper with any approved means of identification required to be on sheep or goats, unless the identification must be removed for medical reasons, in which case new official identification must be applied to the animal as soon as possible and prior to commingling that could result in the loss of identity of the animal. A record documenting the change of official identification must be made.21—64.204(163)  Records.    64.204(1)    Record-keeping requirements for owners.  Records on every animal that requires official ID shall be maintained for five years from the time the animal leaves the flock or dies. For animals not born in the flock, records must include the flock-of-origin number or the previous owner’s name and address, date of acquisition, a description of the animal (sheep or goat, and breed or class), and flock of birth, if known. When official ID tags are applied, it is recommended that the owner correlate official ID with production records, such as lambing dates, for all breeding animals. The owner shall maintain a record of the name and address of the market or buyer, the date, the number of animals sold, and a description of the animals (sheep or goat, and breed or class) for all animals moved from the flock. The owner must supply the market or buyer with the owner’s flock ID number. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI), or a veterinary signature-stamped bill of sale for animals purchased through Iowa markets, is required for every change of ownership of animals in Iowa, other than for animals sold to slaughter. A copy of the CVI or veterinary signature-stamped bill of sale must be maintained for every animal purchased, and for every animal sold privately, other than to slaughter. For animals sold to slaughter, records must show the date of sale, number of animals sold, and where or to whom sold.  64.204(2)    Record-keeping requirements for auction markets.  Markets must collect a completed and signed owner/seller statement form from each seller presenting animals that require official identification or must post where animals are unloaded signs which state that “sexually intact sheep or goats that are known to be scrapie-positive, suspect, high-risk, or exposed, or that originated from a known infected, source, exposed, or noncompliant flock may not be unloaded or sold through this market.” For animals identified by the market, the serial tag numbers applied to each seller’s animals must be recorded. Animals that require official identification, but that cannot be identified to their flock of origin shall not be sold as breeding animals. Bill-of-sale records must indicate the seller or flock ID number(s) or serial tag numbers of the animals involved and will serve as documentation of the buyers of animals presented by any particular seller. The market must always record, either on the owner/seller statement form or separately, the following information on all sexually intact animals that require official identification: the seller’s flock ID number or seller’s name and address, the name or flock ID number of the owner of the flock of origin if different from the seller, and the buyer’s name and address or buyer’s flock ID number. All animals moving interstate must depart from the market with either a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection or slaughter affidavit; all animals remaining in Iowa must depart from the market with a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, veterinary signature-stamped bill of sale, or slaughter affidavit. Certificates of Veterinary Inspection for animals moving interstate must contain the statement set forth in 21—64.208(163). All of these documents must be made available for inspection upon request and maintained as official records for five years.  64.204(3)    Record-keeping requirements for licensed sheep dealers.  The dealer must either collect a completed and signed owner/seller statement form from the person from whom the dealer takes possession of the animals or must post signs as described in 64.204(2) if there is any possibility that the animals will move interstate, other than through slaughter channels. The dealer must always record, either on the owner/seller statement form or separately, the following information on all sexually intact animals that require official identification: the seller’s flock ID number or seller’s name and address and the name of the owner of the flock of origin, or flock-of-origin ID number, if different from the seller. For animals identified by the dealer, the serial tag number applied to each animal must be recorded. Animals that move interstate, other than to slaughter, must be inspected by a veterinarian and have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection that includes the required statements as set forth in 21—64.208(163). All animals that do not go to slaughter must be inspected by a veterinarian and have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection completed prior to sale, unless the animals are being sold at a licensed auction market where a veterinary inspection will occur. For animals that are taken to an auction market, the dealer must provide to the market for its records a list of all flock ID numbers or serial tag numbers in the group. For animals that are resorted and sold, records must identify all potential buyers of any animal acquired. Every effort should be made to maintain the identity of groups from the same flock, through separate penning or use of temporary ID, such as chalk marking, in order to simplify efforts to identify the final destination of individual animals. If animals are under 18 months of age and the dealer picks them up at the owner’s premises and delivers them directly to slaughter, then the official identification requirement may be waived; however, a record of the transaction must be maintained. Records must document the buyer’s name and address or buyer’s flock-of-origin ID number, date of sale, and animals sold for all private sales or sales to slaughter, so that animals can be traced to their final destination. All records must be kept for five years and made available for inspection upon request.21—64.205(163)  Responsibility of persons handling animals in commerce to ensure the official identification of animals.  Licensed sheep dealers and auction markets and those that provide transport must ensure that animals are properly identified upon taking possession of the animals. Animals lacking official ID must either be declined or be identified by the licensed dealer or market with official ID issued to the dealer or market immediately upon the dealer’s or market’s taking possession, and prior to commingling of the animals.21—64.206(163)  Veterinarian’s responsibilities when identifying sheep or goats.  Veterinarians may be called upon to officially identify animals and may be issued official identification for the animals in the form of the serial number ear tags for carrying out this duty. The veterinarian may apply the ID only if the flock-of-origin information is available. Sexually intact animals that require official identification and are of unknown origin shall not be used for breeding and must be restricted until slaughter. When animals are identified, the veterinarian applying the ID must record the serial tag number applied to each animal and the following information (this requirement may be accomplished by collecting a completed owner/seller statement form): the flock-of-origin ID number or name and address of the current owner, if different from the owner of the flock of origin, and the name and address of the buyer, if a change of ownership is occurring. The flock of birth should also be recorded, if known. These records must be kept for five years and made available for inspection upon request.21—64.207(163)  Flock plans.  Infected and source flocks will be quarantined by the department upon the determination of their status. A written flock cleanup plan shall be signed by the owner of an infected or source flock, and the requirements set out in the plan shall be adhered to until its completion. The plan may consist of:
    1. Whole flock depopulation;
    2. The removal of genetically susceptible female animals, suspect animals, positive animals, and the female offspring of positive female animals; or
    3. The removal of high-risk animals as defined in 9 CFR 79.4.
    Indemnity may be paid for animals removed, if funds are available through USDA. All flock plans require cleaning and disinfecting procedures as part of the requirements. Upon completion of the flock plan, the quarantine may be released, with the approval of the DSE, and following an inspection of the premises by a state or federal animal health official. At that time, the owner is required to sign a post-exposure management and monitoring plan (PEMMP) and agree to the requirements set out in that plan. Exposed flocks may also be quarantined, or have other movement restrictions placed on them, and may require a PEMMP plan which is consistent with current USDA regulations.
    21—64.208(163)  Certificates of Veterinary Inspection.  Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (CVIs) issued by licensed accredited veterinarians shall be obtained whenever animals change ownership, other than when animals are sold for slaughter, except as provided in this rule. For animals that require official identification, the CVI must include the individual official ID numbers(s) or the flock-of-origin ID number(s), the total number of animals, the purpose of the movement, the name and address of the consignor and consignee, and the points of origin and destination. CVIs for animals that will move interstate must additionally have the following signed owner statement: “I certify that the sexually intact animals represented on this form are not known to be scrapie-positive, suspect, high-risk, or exposed, and did not originate from a known infected, source, exposed, or noncompliant flock.” The veterinarian may sign the statement (which may be applied in stamp form) on behalf of the owner if a properly executed owner/seller statement form has been collected from the owner or if the animals are at a licensed auction market or a licensed dealer’s place of business where signs, which have been posted where animals are unloaded, state that “sexually intact sheep or goats that are known to be scrapie-positive, suspect, high-risk, or exposed, or that originated from a known infected, source, exposed, or noncompliant flock may not be unloaded or sold through this market.” The veterinarian should check with the state of destination for additional requirements. Animals sold other than to slaughter through state-licensed livestock markets but that will remain in Iowa may be released on either a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection or a veterinary signature-stamped bill of sale. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection may be completed for sexually intact animals from an exposed flock in some circumstances, with the approval of the state veterinarian.21—64.209(163)  Requirements for shows and sales.  Official identification is required for any sexually intact sheep or goat to be exhibited. Positive, suspect, sexually intact exposed, and high-risk animals may not be exhibited. Exposed animals that have been redesignated and had restrictions removed by the DSE according to USDA guidelines may attend shows and sales. Feeder/market class animals from an exposed flock that are not positive, suspect, exposed, or high-risk may be exhibited with the approval of the state veterinarian, provided that they are moved only to slaughter or returned to the premises of origin following the show.  64.209(1)  Female animals over 12 months of age should be penned separately from female animals from other flocks when practical.  64.209(2)  Female animals within 30 days of parturition, postpartum female animals, or female animals that have aborted or are pregnant and have a vaginal discharge must be kept separate from animals from other flocks so as to prohibit any direct contact. Any enclosures used to contain the female animals must be cleaned and disinfected.21—64.210(163)  Movement restrictions for animals and flocks.  A sexually intact animal shall not be moved from an infected or source flock, except under permit. Permitted animals may be moved to slaughter, to a research or diagnostic facility, or to another facility as specified in the flock plan. High-risk, suspect, and sexually intact exposed animals from other than infected or source flocks will be placed under movement restrictions in accordance with 9 CFR 79.3. The movement restrictions on the flock and the criteria for release of these restrictions shall be specified as part of either the flock plan or the postexposure management and monitoring plan. Animals from noncompliant flocks shall be placed under movement restrictions and shall be moved only by permit.21—64.211(163)  Approved terminal feedlots.  Approved terminal feedlots allow purchasers of young sexually intact feeder animals from out of state to bring those animals into Iowa without official identification provided that the animals are restricted to an inspected and approved premises and all are delivered to slaughter by 18 months of age.  64.211(1)    Requirements for approved terminal feedlots.  All sexually intact animals of out-of-state origin that have arrived without official identification must be moved directly to slaughter by 18 months of age. Other sheep or goats that require official identification may be maintained on the premises provided that the requirements described herein are met. The approved terminal feedlot premises must be designated as either:  a.    Feeder-only premises.  Feeder-only premises may contain only feeder animals destined to slaughter by 18 months of age.  b.    Breeding flock/slaughter-only premises.  The breeding flock/slaughter-only premises allows a breeding flock to be maintained on the site. All offspring must be sent to slaughter by 18 months of age (except as noted below), and do not require official ID provided that the slaughter animals move directly to slaughter. Adult animals must be identified, and any of their offspring retained as replacement breeding stock must have official ID applied prior to weaning. Production, inventory, purchase, and sales records will be inspected on all breeding animals.  c.    Separate operation premises.  The separate operation premises allows animals other than the nonidentified feeder animals to be kept on site, and sold other than to slaughter, but these animals must be separated from the feeder animals by a distance of 30 feet or by a solid wall that prevents contact or the passage of fluids. Offspring must be identified prior to weaning. Records must account for the arrival and dispersal of each individual animal in the separate flock, and there shall be no identification exemption on these animals.All three types of approved terminal feedlot premises require that all nonidentified feeder animals be moved directly to slaughter, or another approved terminal feedlot, prior to 18 months of age. These animals may only be sold through a licensed market or licensed dealer if the owner identifies sexually intact animals with official blue metal “meat only” tags, and the animals are sold to slaughter.  64.211(2)    Identification at approved terminal feedlots.  Out-of-state origin sexually intact feeder animals moved to an approved terminal feedlot will be exempted from identification requirements provided that the feedlot maintains compliance with all rules and regulations governing approved terminal feedlots.  64.211(3)    Registration of approved terminal feedlots.  All approved terminal feedlots must obtain a permit issued by the department. Approved terminal feedlots will be subject to periodic records and premises inspections. The department shall assign an approved terminal feedlot number for each approved terminal feedlot facility.  64.211(4)    Records for approved terminal feedlots.  All approved terminal feedlots must maintain appropriate records for a period of five years. Records will include Certificates of Veterinary Inspection for all animals of out-of-state origin received by the facility and slaughter records sufficient to conduct inventory reconciliation. If a breeding flock or any other sheep or goats that require official identification are maintained on the same premises, then records shall also include an inventory of animals, lambing and kidding records, bills of sale, slaughter receipts, and any Certificates of Veterinary Inspection sufficient to account for the acquisition and dispersal of all animals. Failure to maintain appropriate records shall be grounds for revocation of the feedlot permit. All animals without official identification must be moved directly to slaughter, and movement to slaughter must be completed before any of the animals reach the age of 18 months. If blue metal “meat only” tags are applied, then records on tags applied must be maintained and shall consist of serial tag numbers, origin of the group(s) (state, market, or individual), date of tagging, and destination (date sold and buyer).These rules are intended to implement Iowa Code chapter 163.21—chapter 64 cumulative history
    Related ARC(s): 9102B, 0230C, 0230C, 2591C, 0230C, 9102B, 9942B, 0656C, 9102B, 9102B, 9102B, 9102B, 0656C, 0391C, 1024C, 9102B, 0230C, 1802C, 9102B, 9942B, 0230C, 0391C, 0656C, 1024C, 1802C, 2591C